sinus

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Related to cerebral sinus: venous sinus

sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Cerebral sinus thrombosis associated with severe active ulcerative colitis.
Bradley et al reported 9 cases ofotogenic sigmoid sinus thrombosis, 6 of which were treated with anticoagulation.(6) They asserted that treatment recommendations based on the neurology, hematology, and neurosurgery literature--which deal with cerebral sinus thrombosis in a variety of locations with both septic and aseptic etiologies and more severe outcomes--were not necessarily applicable to patients with otogenic sigmoid sinus thrombosis.
This condition is also referred to as cortical venous, cerebral sinus, cerebral venous sinus, or dural sinus thrombosis.
Abbreviations AED: Antiepileptic drugs aPTT: Activated partial thromboplastin time CSVT: Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis CT: Computed tomography CXR: Chest radiograph EEG: Electroencephalogram ECG: Electrocardiogram FFP: Fresh Frozen Plasma GBS: Group B Streptococcus GIR: Glucose Infusion Rate GTT: Glucose tolerance test HUS: Head ultrasound IUGR: Intrauterine growth restriction IVH: Intraventricular hemorrhage KB: Kleihauer-Betke test LMWH: Low molecular weight heparin MCA: Middle cerebral artery MRI: Magnetic resonance imaging MRV: Magnetic resonance venography NICU: Neonatal intensive care unit PAIS: Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke PNC: Prenatal care PROM: Prolonged rupture of membranes RBC: Red blood cells.
Adults with cyanotic CHD are also at high risk of stroke and thromboembolism.4 Stroke is also a frequent complication in patients with TOF, the commonest form of grown-up CHD.5 Congenital cardiac malformations could lead to formation of an intra-cardiac thrombus (in the right heart chambers and left atrium in patients with CHD and in left ventricle in patients with cardiomyopathy) as well as facilitate thrombogenicity in central nervous system (cerebral artery, cerebral vein, and cerebral sinus).3 Alioglu et al.
Therefore, cerebral sinus venous thrombosis should be included in differential diagnosis if the patient presents with unexplained CNS disorders of sudden onset in complicated NPSLE with thrombophilia.