ceremonial

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ceremonial

Christianity
a. the prescribed order of rites and ceremonies
b. a book containing this
References in periodicals archive ?
This complexity is in evidence from chapter 1, which locates the source of the Laudian movement in the Arminian theology and ceremonialist piety of Lancelot Andrewes and his followers.
So it's different from the Blackfoot situation where bundles are transferred from one community to another, not just from one family to another, and where it's acceptable for a ceremonialist from one community to voice thoughts for what's appropriate for a bundle that originated in a different Blackfoot community.
Many grumbles were heard in the next generation, yet the generation after that produced a backlash in favour of set liturgy, principally through Richard Hooker, with his new self-confidently ceremonialist vision of worship.
While acknowledging that religion was not the sole cause of the English Civil War or of the political and socio-economic upheaval at mid-century in England, Achsah Guibbory chooses to focus on how the ritual vs anti-ritual ideologies (the Laudian or ceremonialist vs the Puritan) manifest themselves in seventeenth-century English society and in the writings of George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Sir Thomas Browne, and John Milton.
What at some distance might seem trivial disagreements about the form and practice of worship took on broad cultural significance as Puritan and ceremonialist ideologies competed to define the meaning of the religious experience: "at stake .
misgivings about the increasingly ceremonialist emphasis of the Anglican
5,224) the primitive mind is incapable of grasping the abstract thought to any appreciable extent; the savage is a ceremonialist, not a dogmatic theologian.
In fact, I became such a staunch ceremonialist that for a long time I went to one virtually every week and I became educated in our ceremonial way.
Well known as a ceremonialist and as a liturgical scholar, Cosin took part in the revision of the Book of Common Prayer--no one since Cranmer had done so much in shaping its familiar cadences.
Remarkably, this Roman Catholic strategy was then borrowed at the end of the sixteenth century by those members of the Church of England who pioneered a ceremonialist and sacramentalist theology within the bounds of this Reformed Church.
The issue of the veil in particular became a lightning rod for the laity's misgivings about the increasingly ceremonialist emphasis of the Anglican Church.