cerine

cerine

[′sir‚ēn]
(mineralogy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Putting an interesting spin on the familiar, the New York design studio presented its latest lighting collection, Cerine. Founded by designers Josh Metersky and Aiden Bowman, the Brooklyn-based studio's commitment to an authentic concept reflects in the brand name.
He married Maybell Cerine in June 1943 in San Francisco.
A microstructural model by space tessellation for a sintered ceramic: cerine. Image Anal Stereol 24:105-16.
She was preceded in death by a brother, Ralph Tisei, and a sister, Frances Ricci, and a granddaughter, Cassandra Cerine Berti.
When investigated around 1810, by which time it had come to be considered a kind of hornblende (Hisinger, 1810), the mineral was found to contain one-third cerium oxide, and was given the name cerine (Hisinger, 1811).
She was born June 6, 1922, in Logsden, Ore., to Henry and Olga Cerini Cerine.
'This' is Cerines supper club -- which admittedly I'd never heard of till recently, even though it's been going for nearly four years.
Oh, and by the way, the name for their home 'Cerines' comes from a Venetian variation of the harbour town of Kyrenia, from where Ioanna has her roots.
The event is also supported by Aegean Airlines, the CERINES supper club, Stella Artois, Gloria Jeans and the Together Cyprus volunteers' network.
And it's also the dwelling that has inspired the sensation that is the Cerines website.