cerite


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cerite

[′sir‚īt]
(mineralogy)
(Ca,Fe)Ce3Si3O12·H2O A brown rare-earth hydrous silicate of cerium and other metals found in gneiss; hardness is 5.5 on Mohs scale, and specific gravity is 4.86.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cerium-containing mineral was then named cerite.
In the 1820's, Carl Gustaf Mosander (1797-1858), chemist, surgeon and mineralogist, continued the investigation of cerite from Bastnas.
In the nearby Cerite mine there was one band of cerium ore 30 to 60 cm wide and 6 to 7 meters long, and one narrower band; both ended at about 20 meters depth (Geijer, 1920).
It occurs as jet-black to brownish masses, typically exhibiting a platy habit, within the amphibole skarn, and as compact masses with cerite. Chalcopyrite, bismuthinite, bastnasite and rarely linneite occur with the allanite-(Ce).
It also occurs mixed with cerite together with bismuthinite and small amounts of chalcopyrite.
Cerite was probably characterized as a species in the 1740's; long before that time the mineral was known as "Bastnas tungsten" (= "heavy stone of Bastnas").
Nordenskiold (1873) looked through thousands of specimens of dump material as well as in various collections, but found only one specimen containing crystals of cerite. The specimen, from the Bergskollegium (Board of Mines) collection, was collected in 1746, and is labeled "Wismuthglants and green copper ore in Tungsten and black skorlberg [probably allanite-(Ce)].
Cerite has a flesh-red to gray color and occurs as large, dense masses up to 30 cm, associated with amphiboles, allanite, bastnasite and tornebohmite.