cesium chloride

cesium chloride

[′sē·zē·əm ′klȯr‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
CsCl Colorless cuboid crystals, melting point 646°C; used in filaments of radio tubes to increase sensitivity, in photoelectric cells, and for photosensitive deposit on cathodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cesium chloride protects cerebellar granule neurons from apoptosis induced by low potassium.
Because of its dispersibility, solubility, penetrating radiation, source activity, and presence across the United States in facilities such as hospitals, blood banks, and universities, many of which are located in large population centers, radioactive cesium chloride is a greater concern than other Category 1 and 2 sources for some attack scenarios.
Once radioactive cesium and iodine, the most common elements likely to be carried any distance, mix with seawater, they form cesium chloride and sodium iodide, common compounds that would be diluted into the ocean, experts said.
government institute policies that curb the use of cesium chloride, which is also found in medical and other research equipment and can be used to make dirty bombs.
The team has developed two methods for filling and sealing the micromachined cells: chemical reaction between barium azide and cesium chloride in an ultrahigh vacuum system followed by anodic bonding of the silicon chip to a glass window in a nitrogen buffer gas ambient, and direct injection of liquid Cs in an anaerobic chamber followed by anodic bonding to a glass window in a nitrogen buffer gas ambient.
Cesium chloride, a component of naturopathic cancer remedies, induced torsades de pointes in a man who had had normal echocardiographic and laboratory results before starting the alternative treatment for his prostate cancer, reported Dr.
The portion of the strip containing only plasma was cut out with a scalpel and added to 1 mL of cesium chloride (1.5 mmol/L) in a 1.5-mL conical tube, left to stand for 10 min, and then centrifuged at 10 000g in an Eppendorf 5412 microcentrifuge.
Oocysts of the AUCP-1 isolate were extracted from the feces of experimentally infected calves and cleaned of fecal debris with cesium chloride (32).
The supernatant was layered on a 1.3-ml cesium chloride (CsCl; Boehringer Mannheim, Indianapolis, IN)solution (5.7 M CsCl, 0.5 M EDTA, pH = 8.0) in a 13- x 51-mm ultracentrifuge poly-allomer tube (Beckman Instruments Inc., Palo Alto, CA), and centrifuged at 40,000 rpm at 20 [degrees] C for 12 h in an SW50.1 rotor (Beckman Instruments Inc.).
Standard cesium solution (1000 mg/L) was prepared from cesium chloride (Fluka, Germany) by dissolving 1.2670 g in 1-litre distilled water.