cesium-134

cesium-134

[′sē·zē·əm ‚wən‚thərd·ē′fȯr]
(nuclear physics)
An isotope of cesium, atomic mass number of 134; emits negative beta particles and has a half-life of 2.19 years; used in photoelectric cells and in ion propulsion systems under development.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report does not include cesium-134 as the research group initially lacked resources to measure it, meaning the amount of estimated radioactive material will increase with further calculations.
The contaminated water in the pit contained radioactive cesium-134 at a
The partial meltdown of Fukushima, in contrast, released only five isotopes measurable by the Seattle team: iodine-131, iodine-132, tellurium-132, cesium-134 and cesium-137.
According to South Korean News Agency Yonhap, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) reported Minuscule traces of iodine-131 were found in the seven areas including Seoul with traces of cesium-134 and cesium-137 was detected in four areas.
Only a few weeks after the accident, a research cruise undertaken by Makio Honda and colleagues at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, or JAMS-TEe, detected low levels of both cesium-137 and cesium-134 some 1,900 kilometers (1,180 miles) from Fukushima, from radioactive gases carried out to sea by winds.
Soil samples taken at nine spots at the plant port in late November contained as many as 870,000 becquerels of cesium-137 per kilogram of soil and 730,000 becquerels of cesium-134 per kilogram of soil, according to Tokyo Electric Power Co.
However, some aspects are predictable, such as cesium-134, cesium-137, strontium-90, various forms of plutonium, americium, and iodine-131.
The system's analysis capability is targeted at detection of radioactive cesium-134 and -137.
For a six-month period from October 2011 through March 2012, the researchers collected readings of participants' levels of cesium-134 and -137 using a whole-body counter.
The Nuclear Regulation Authority has told TEPCO it will authorize the Fukushima plant to discharge water from within the barriers only if radiation readings are below 15 becquerels per liter for cesium-134, below 25 becquerels per liter for cesium-137, and below 10 becquerels per liter for strontium-90 and if other radioactive substances that emit gamma rays are not present.
Reports have claimed that the contaminated water with 15 times higher levels of cesium-134 and cesium-137 could rise to the ground's surface within three weeks.
He said cesium-134 does not naturally occur in the environment.