cetology


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cetology

[sē′täl·ə·jē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The study of whales.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For tourist promoters keen to enlist cetology into their education efforts, Ford's classifications facilitated the projection of environmental identity onto the whale identification act--a nominally "non-musical" gesture rendered aesthetic by its context.
a poem!--why it is a whale of a book, in medias res, refusing category, fusing adventure tale with cetology, the tale of the Demos at sea, high Faustian drama dismantling plot, narrative (why should we call him Ishmael and where does he go until he lands on the coffin?) Moby-Dick is poetry!
In fact, it may be the characteristic text of encyclopedic novels: to name three other examples, similar purposelessness can be seen in the pseudo-scientific cetology chapter of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, the idiotic minor-character chatter about art and economics in William Gaddis's The Recognitions and J R, and the endless catalogs of nondescript minor poets in Roberto Bolano's novels.
James read Moby-Dick aloud, every last word, including the cetology stuff, to the five-year-old boy and his three-year-old sister.
Perseus." Then, as you say, The voyage begun, enter the Cetology of
The first formal discussion of biology occurs in Chapter XXXII, "Cetology." Here we find Melville, the sailor, boldly at odds with academic zoologists and taxonomists.
The costumes, like the endless representations of the whale in cetology, are not so much false as, taken each by itself, inadequate.
Still, that Hayes slights Moby-Dick's cetology sections, the notorious "Squeeze of the Hand" chapter, and the character Pip, so important to Stuckey's analysis, is surprising.
"No branch of Zoology is so much involved as that which is entitled Cetology," says Captain Scoresby, A.D.
In his long chapter on horror fiction, he thoroughly disparages those academics who disagree with his convictions that story is more important than theme, mood, tone, symbol, style, and even characterization and that it is "impervious to analysis"; such critics "would feel vastly more comfortable if Moby-Dick were a doctoral thesis on cetology rather than an account of what happened on the Pequod's final voyage." Such critics are bullshit-slingers; they are banqueters at the "long and groaning table of Graduate Studies in English"; they are tailors for the Emperor
This claim might seem puzzling for a text continually studied over the last century for its symbols, with its elaborate structure of ancillaries, its Etymology and epigrammatic "Extracts," its chapters on "Cetology" and "The Whiteness of the Whale," not to mention the musings of the characters on the object of Ahab's mad quest, principally Ahab (a Puritan heir) himself.