Chafe


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chafe

 

inflammation of the skin formed in places where there is pressure or friction.

Sores from chafing most often arise on the skin of the feet from improper selection of footwear. Sweating and flatfoot promote the development of such sores. They are manifested by a painful area of redness and edema of the skin, often with formation of blisters filled with transparent fluid. Complications may set in from infection, with the formation of a furuncle, abscess, or lymphadenitis. Treatment consists in the removal of the cause, as well as warm baths with potassium permanganate. The blisters are opened and anointed with brilliant green or methylene blue. If blisters are absent, an aseptic oily dressing is applied. Chafes can be prevented by observing the rules of personal hygiene, selecting proper footwear and clothing, controlling perspiration, and treating for flatfoot.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tonal plan of Cantata 106 is one of descent-ascent, moving from E[flat]-major and C-minor flatward through F-minor to B[flat]-minor and then sharpward through A[flat]-major back to C-minor and E[flat]-major, pivoting symmetrically around the alto solo "In deine Hande." Chafe sees the tonal allegory thus:
Chafe, who is finishing a biography of Bill and Hillary Clinton has said that where President Clinton "grew into an international role" in his second term, becoming obsessive about trying to win peace in the Middle East, Obama started his presidency with a strong international understanding, and added that because of his background, Obama will likely be even more pro-India than Clinton.
Although much of this has been noted in scholarship before, never has it been articulated with anything like the clarity, detail, and sophistication that Chafe brings to the task.
I guess it was the challenge; to be able to look forward to the moment when I could say: 'I doo'd it!' A true "renaissance man," my Dad, James Warren Chafe, died on 27 April 1984, at age 83.
Chafe believes that the choices these leaders made at key moments in their lives had a profound impact on the type of people they became and the type of leaders they were.
It hardly helps when gay conservatives pillory organizations that strive for racial parity or chafe at making alliances with other groups and their causes.
Although those of us who advocate change in universities certainly chafe at the slow pace of that change, and there is room for universities to move faster and be more responsive to community needs, there is little likelihood that those changes will bring universities to the quarter-to-quarter mentality of the business world.
Electroacoustic composer- performer Chris Chafe and clavichord virtuoso Joan Benson will combine their talents in a recital titled "Tronika Time-Transit" at 8 p.m.
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As her opening move, the editor reprints Gloria Wade-Gayles's 1996 personal-is-most-definitely-political essay "Who Says an Older Woman Can't/Shouldn't Dance?", which begins with the deceptively mild observation that, "when you are fifty and over, people seem to feel the need to tell you how well you are physically wearing/weathering your age." in her inspiring, delightful dance for/of words, Wade-Gayles joyfully dares to rethink ideology and its critique by claiming of her cherished maternal identity that "I chafe at the very idea that anyone would attribute this joy to patriarchy, to sexism, to restrictions on my life." Less successful is Sue V.