chalcostibite

chalcostibite

[‚kal·kō′sti‚bīt]
(mineralogy)
CuSbS2 A lead-gray mineral consisting of antimony copper sulfide.
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Sulphosalt group compounds such as chalcostibite (CuSb[S.sub.2]), famatinite ([Cu.sub.3]Sb[S.sub.4]), and tetrahedrite ([Cu.sub.12][Sb.sub.4][S.sub.13]) are part of a relatively new class of material containing antimony.
It was found from the literature that chalcostibite shows a strong Raman peak at ~337 [cm.sup.-1], tetrahedrite at ~351[cm.sup.-1], and famatinite at ~333[cm.sup.-1] (strong peak), 283 and 369 [cm.sup.-1] (low-intensity peak) [12].
Associated minerals are: scainiite, zinkenite, boulangerite, robinsonite, tintinaite, sorbyite and other incompletely characterized minerals, Other associated minerals are: sphalerite, cinnabar, galena, andorite, bournonite, tetrahedrite, chalcostibite, gersdorffite, barite, cerussite and stibiconite.
See Jocullani, San Luis 1 Bolivar 1 Aikinite, ankerite, benjaminite, berryite, bismuthinite, chalcopyrite, krupskaite, (*) payonite, pyrite, siderite Bolivar 2 See Antequera, El Salvador Bolivia Jamesonite Bolsa Negra Ferberite, scheelite, aka Nevada wolframite Cacachaca Chalcostibite. See Rosita, Terremoto Cachilaguna Halite, natron, thermonatrite, trona, ulexite Calacalani Full name: San Antonio de Calacalani; see San Antonio 1 Calama Bismuth, gold, gypsum, silver Caluyo Stibnite.
Associated minerals are: zinkenite, boulangerite, robinsonite, tintinaite, sorbyite, a new chloro-sulfosalt, sphalerite, cinnabar, galena, andorite, bournonite, tetrahedrite, chalcostibite, gersdorffite, barite, cerussite and stibiconite.
Chalcostibite is rare at Rudabanya, found in small cavities in the spongy siderite ores of the Polyanka, Andrassy I and III sections.
Skinnerite is closely associated with chalcostibite and chalcocite.
Among these minerals are arsenopyrite and chalcostibite, both of which occur sparingly as isolated euhedral crystals in some of the massive native antimony; jamesonite, which was noted as an inclusion in a single grain of gudmundite; and rare, scattered grains of pyrite and chalcopyrite.
Albite Albite Antimony Aragonite Breithauptite Antimony Arsenopyrite Goethite Calcite Berthierite Berthierite Gypsum Chalcopyrite Chlorite Chalcostibite Malachite Chlorite Dolomite Chlorite Metastibnite?
And a real killer find was the chalcostibite belonging to Frederic and fellow Frenchman Christophe Dubois.
The crystals are a dull metallic gray, and form needle-like or bladed crystals to 1 cm, occasionally associated with slightly iridescent metallic black chalcostibite crystals to 1 cm on brown siderite crystals.