chambered nautilus


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chambered nautilus:

see nautilusnautilus
or chambered nautilus,
cephalopod mollusk belonging to the sole surviving genus (Nautilus) of a subclass that flourished 200 million years ago, known as the nautiloids.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Chambered Nautilus never looked more handsomely masculine, its prose glittering like the back of a surfacing whale.
Unlike its namesake the chambered nautilus, which is permanently attached within its shell, the paper nautilus uses its specialized tentacles to hold onto its "shell" and keep it from washing away.
It's very mysterious, as this ratio appears in unrelated works and natural phenomena, from the chambered nautilus to galaxies to artwork and architecture.
Oliver Wendell Holmes's "The Chambered Nautilus" (1858)--another renowned excursion into cephalopodic lyricism-presents the nautilus's step-by-step construction of its shell as an inspirational example: "Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul." But where Holmes's poem celebrates incrementalism, "The Kraken" rejects it altogether.
Some of the unusual sea life that visitors can glimpse at "Oddwater" include the chambered nautilus, which is notable for its unusual movement.
SHELL-STOCKED From pillows to picture frames and this mother-of-pearl jewel box ($450) topped with chambered nautilus shell, FantaSea celebrates the sea's beauty.
Seashell, 31 indeed resembles a chambered nautilus cut into being with crisp, angular shapes of pinks, reds, and plums in warm electric tones; Damaged, 46 is formally attired in pitch black, grays, and white and recalls shattered crystal.
The deepest layer contains traces of seafloor burrows and large numbers of phosphate nodules that include the fossils of ammonites, the extinct relatives of today's chambered nautilus.
The sloping and tilting roof gains width as it surrounds the circular welcoming center and is indicative of a number of different forms in nature and in Native American culture -- the beginning of a spider web, the shape of a pine cone as it unfolds, or the form of a Chambered Nautilus' shell.