chancel arch


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chancel arch

chancel arch
An arch which, in many churches, marks the separation of the chancel or sanctuary from the nave or body of the church.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chancel arch window, which collapsed in the 1950s, has now been reinstated, making it visible for the first time in some 60 years.
St Michael's Church still has the tower, chancel arch and south walls from the original Norman building and other interesting features include a fine carved oak pulpit, effigies (under the tower) and a font.
St Mary The Virgin in Elland has its origins in the late 12th century and still has its original chancel arch.
BLOOMING LOVELY The parish church of St Mary the Virgin in Whickham - its nave and chancel arch date back to Norman times, when the district was known as Quykham - occupies a beautiful setting, which is photographed here by The Journal's Lewis Arnold.
And in a sense of misplaced triumph he painted his coat of arms high on the chancel arch of the church and erected a beacon on the highest point of the hills.
The tower is the oldest structure in the area and also features a medieval font, a holy water stoup and an "apparently Norman" chancel arch.
For example, she identifies almost imperceptible traces of the underdrawing for a mandorla on the stonework to either side of the wooden panel upon which a representation of God the Father now presides over the frescoed scene of heaven, situated above the chancel arch.
A right hand bend on the north side of the village takes us back to All Saints' Church, which has Norman stonework in the entrance porch and chancel arch and fragments of 10th century Anglo-Danish tombstones under the tower.
The church has its origins in the late 12th century and still has its original chancel arch.
High above the chancel arch can be seen the famous Doom Painting, a medieval vision of heaven and hell created in 1435, restored in recent years and described as being one of the finest examples in Europe.
On each side of the chancel arch is carved the faces of Adam and Eve, originally 13th Century, and whose joyful and alternatively sorrowful expressions reflect before and after the Fall.
Their work is best seen at Kilpeck - on the south door and chancel arch - but you can chart their progress across the county, from Fownhope and Shobdon to Castle Frome and Eardisley.