changeover

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changeover

1. Sport
a. the act of transferring to or being relieved by a team-mate in a relay race, as by handing over a baton, etc.
b. the point in a relay race at which the transfer is made
2. Sport chiefly Brit the exchange of ends by two teams, esp at half time

changeover

(programming)
The time when a new system has been tested successfully and replaces the old system.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 at the Dubai Duty Free Men's Open, has a reputation of re-gripping at every changeover, rolling the tape halfway and giving the handle a dual tone.
Assuming this profile processor performs five changeovers a week for 48 weeks in a year, this computes to $52,500 annually.
Changeover time is defined as the time between the end of the IR preheat and the beginning of vibration welding.
On 1 January 2015, Lithuania adopted the euro as its official currency andthe changeover is running smoothly and according to plan.
Its latest report, Staggering Trainee Changeover, states: "There is a clear need for change in the process of trainee doctor changeover.
With increased speed and lower changeover time resulting in higher productivity, the platform allows manufacturers to reduce the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of their automated production lines.
Automatic changeovers like the Auto-Logic II pictured in Figure 2 allow the user to start with high pressure cylinders on both sides, then expand to a cryogenic source on one side and a high pressure source on the other side.
The amount of changeovers, and thus the amount of product variety, is logically limited by the amount of time spent and the obstacles faced with each changeover.
Session 5 -- Rapid Changeovers in the Paper Industry
The best way I can keep nay carrying costs down is to have more changeovers and get much, much better at them.
Whether you run a small cabinet shop with 15 employees or a larger plant with 150 employees, you must minimize the negative effect of changeovers on the cost and throughput of the item being manufactured.
Schedules were characterized by high-volume runs of the same products with few changeovers and long lead times.