change

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change

1. money given or received in return for its equivalent in a larger denomination or in a different currency
2. the balance of money given or received when the amount tendered is larger than the amount due
3. Archaic a place where merchants meet to transact business; an exchange
4. Astronomy the transition from one phase of the moon to the next
5. the order in which a peal of bells may be rung
6. Sport short for changeover

change

see SOCIAL CHANGE.

change

In building construction, an authorized alteration or deviation from the design or scope of work as originally defined by the contract documents.
References in classic literature ?
The traditional conception of cause and effect is one which modern science shows to be fundamentally erroneous, and requiring to be replaced by a quite different notion, that of LAWS OF CHANGE. In the traditional conception, a particular event A caused a particular event B, and by this it was implied that, given any event B, some earlier event A could be discovered which had a relation to it, such that--
Changes in estate also issue from this, for if, to one who governs himself with caution and patience, times and affairs converge in such a way that his administration is successful, his fortune is made; but if times and affairs change, he is ruined if he does not change his course of action.
And we ourselves grow and change just as a nation does.
Under the influence of a great mental and moral upheaval, his character and his habits had taken on the appearance of complete change, but after a while with the subsidence of the storm, both began to settle toward their former places.
I understood but too well the change in her manner, to greater kindness and quicker readiness in interpreting all my wishes, before others--to constraint and sadness, and nervous anxiety to absorb herself in the first occupation she could seize on, whenever we happened to be left together alone.
Then everything which is good, whether made by art or nature, or both, is least liable to suffer change from without?
Every new regulation concerning commerce or revenue, or in any way affecting the value of the different species of property, presents a new harvest to those who watch the change, and can trace its consequences; a harvest, reared not by themselves, but by the toils and cares of the great body of their fellow-citizens.
I am well aware that this doctrine of natural selection, exemplified in the above imaginary instances, is open to the same objections which were at first urged against Sir Charles Lyell's noble views on 'the modern changes of the earth, as illustrative of geology;' but we now very seldom hear the action, for instance, of the coast-waves, called a trifling and insignificant cause, when applied to the excavation of gigantic valleys or to the formation of the longest lines of inland cliffs.
But the different forms of motion have their own contraries in other forms; thus destruction is the contrary of generation, diminution of increase, rest in a place, of change of place.
Thomas Jefferson believed that to preserve the very foundations of our nation we would need dramatic change from time to time.
A CAT fell in love with a handsome Young Man, and entreated Venus to change her into a woman.
In general, the beginning and the causes of seditions in all states are such as I have now described, and revolutions therein are brought about in two ways, either by violence or fraud: if by violence, either at first by compelling them to submit to the change when it is made.