chant


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Related to chant: Gregorian chant

chant,

general name for one-voiced, unaccompanied, liturgical music. Usually it refers to the liturgical melodies of the Byzantine, Russian Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Anglican churches and is analogous to cantillation in Jewish liturgical music, Qur'anic chanting in Islam, and single-line chanting in other religions. Roman Catholic chant, commonly called Gregorian chant or plainsongplainsong
or plainchant,
the unharmonized chant of the medieval Christian liturgies in Europe and the Middle East; usually synonymous with Gregorian chant, the liturgical music of the Roman Catholic Church.
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, is diatonic, modally organized (see modemode,
in music. 1 A grouping or arrangement of notes in a scale with respect to a most important note (in the pretonal modes of Western music, this note is called the final or finalis
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), and has a free rhythm determined by the text. Anglican chant is a harmonized, metrical adaptation to English texts of the Gregorian method of psalm singing, in which a short melody is adjusted to the length of different psalm verses by repeating one tone, the recitation tone, for any number of words in the text. The texts of Anglican chant, used in many Protestant churches, are from the Book of Common PrayerBook of Common Prayer,
title given to the service book used in the Church of England and in other churches of the Anglican Communion. The first complete English Book of Common Prayer was produced, mainly by Thomas Cranmer, in 1549 under Edward VI.
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.

chant

1. a simple song or melody
2. a short simple melody in which several words or syllables are assigned to one note, as in the recitation of psalms
3. a psalm or canticle performed by using such a melody
References in periodicals archive ?
She demonstrates that neo-Gregorian chant circulated widely around the Beneventan region, but that it was anything but standardised.
Broadcaster Alan Green, who witnessed the Hillsborough disaster, said in a BBC interview: "I have been very privileged over 30 years to commentate on major games involving Liverpool and Manchester United, and all I hear is chants about Hillsborough and Munich.
PCCC's focus, Chant says, is on helping children "achieve whatever they individually are able to achieve.
The core theme of Iranian domestic propaganda is not the death chant, however, but rather painting the United States as unalterably hostile to Iran, Iranians and Islam in an effort to focus the Iranian public's anger on a foreign threat rather than domestic issues.
The 40-year-old group said they exist mainly to help preserve and spread the tradition of Gregorian chant.
I really see a certain kind of balance or calm in children who have experienced these sacred chants within the womb.
Cardiff City and Swansea City supporters' groups welcomed the move, but they were split over whether anti-Welsh chants should be considered racist in the new guidance.
Analysis of the different musical styles found in traditional chant follows in chapter 2.
Summary: Tottenham are unlikely to face action over chants at Emmanuel Adebayor which prompted allegations of racism from the Real Madrid striker.
Treitler is one of the foremost scholars to challenge chant scholarship predicated exclusively on arguments built from the existing written sources, to the neglect of the implications of the origins of chant as an oral performance practice.
A chant is any group of words recited with a lively predictable beat that typically follows a 1,2,3,4 rhythm pattern with a stronger emphasis, or stress on certain words or syllables and less emphasis on other words or syllables (Forster, 2006).
Chant melodies were brought into conformity with late Renaissance concepts of modality in which pitches functioned not just melodically but also within a developing network of implied harmonic relationships.