chaotic advection

chaotic advection

[kā′äd·ik ad′vek·shən]
(fluid mechanics)
Fluid motion in which the trajectories of particles initially quite close diverge rapidly, even though the flow carrying the particles may be simple.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The full spherical geometry, as opposed to tangent plane approximations, is particularly important when considering global streamline patterns generated by a given vorticity distribution...These patterns, in turn, provide the dynamical templates by which one can begin to understand the chaotic advection of particles in a vortex-dominated flow."
A different but complementary mechanism is that of laminar, chaotic advection (Aref 1984, Ottino 1989) in which chaotic particle paths can be used to enhance heat transfer (Acharya et al.
A new process for processing plastic composites filled with nanoparticles is based on chaotic advection. Zumbrunnen has used this process, smart blending, to produce a food-packaging material with reduced gas permeability and to produce conductive materials.
A sampling of topics includes: the Delay logistic model, three- dimensional and higher-dimensional models, non-chaotic systems, rotations, shape and form, chaotic advection, and chaos in galaxies and related simulations.
Also look out for interesting papers on improving the performance of PLA and PLA foams in Sessions M2, M7, and T28; extruding thermoplastic starches in M22 and T28; and "chaotic advection" polymer alloying in T4 and T26.
Underlying concepts were first articulated by Aref (8) who denoted this fluid motion by the precise term, chaotic advection. Chaotic advection has become an important sub-field of fluid mechanics (9).
Their mixing chambers, which amount to less than 1/100,000 of a cubic cm, use chaotic advection to mix the drugs in only 30 sec.
The first two commercial devices have been installed to melt blend two or more polymers using a structured fluid-dynamic mixing process known as "chaotic advection." This process creates unusual micro-scale and nano-scale phase morphologies that potentially can optimize extruded film properties using fewer materials and extruders than with highly layered coextrusion.
By alternately driving the inner and outer cylinders at low speed, Ottino can produce chaotic advection of fluid particles throughout most of the fluid volume.
In addition, Clemson University's new melt-folding technology, called "chaotic advection," can create a repeatable stack of up to 1000 semi-continuous microlayers (see "Learn More" box) in a feedblock-like device called a SmartBlender.
of Mechanical Engineering at Clemson University in Clemson, S.C., with National Science Foundation support, the SmartBlender uses a principle of fluid dynamics known as chaotic advection to fold a masterbatch or other component into a matrix polymer.
"Chaotic advection" is a new way of combining two or more polymer melts to create a many-layered swirl (like a marble cake) rather than a uniform mixture.