chapel of ease


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chapel of ease

A church built within the bounds of a parish for the attendance of those who cannot reach the parish church conveniently.
References in periodicals archive ?
Midhopestones, near Sheffield, a chapel of ease rebuilt in 1703 has a good example of early box pews, some of which have the occupants' names on them.
Walk back to the lane, but detour left on the way to the medieval chapel of ease, a striking sight on a low rise in a field.
This chapel of ease was paid for by John Gough and was opened in 1833.
Derek, parish council secretary who lives in nearby Ouston, has carried out research on the church and village and found there was a chapel of ease on the site of the present church in 1286 which was linked to St Cuthbert's Church in Chester-le-Street.
Eventually, St John's, originally a chapel of ease to St Mary's, became the parish church.
The church was built as a chapel of ease in the 13th Century for parishioners unable to attend the mother church at Wappenbury in times of flood.
It should mean a new era for a church which was a chapel of ease until 1545, when Eston folk got their own priest, and which served as respite for pilgrims and travellers between Whitby, Gisborough Priory and Lindisfarne.
Originally it was a chapel of ease to the mother church at Walton, until Liverpool became a separate parish in 1699.
1810: A chapel of ease, funded by public subscription, is built in the village.
100 Years Ago The growth of population in Christ Church parish, Sparkbrook, has necessitated the erection of a chapel of ease at the corner of Walford and Golden Hillock Roads, on a site presented by the trustees of the Birmingham Churches Fund, and on Saturday afternoon the sacred edifice, which is named Emmanuel Church, was consecrated by the Bishop of Coventry in the presence of a large congregation.
At this time, Stockingford was not a separate parish, and the church formed a Chapel of Ease to Nuneaton Parish Church, which at the time was in the Diocese of Lichfield and Coventry.
When the Abbey was built the place of worship became a 'capella ad portas', a gateway chapel of ease for the use of strangers and visitors.