characteristic form

characteristic form

[‚kar·ik·tə′ris·tik ′fȯrm]
(mathematics)
A means of classifying partial differential equations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rock superstar Ozzy Osbourne in characteristic form earlier this year; right, Ozzy in the mid-1980s; with Black Sabbath in the early 1970s.
As to Ataka, its mercurial leader Volen Siderov was in characteristic form on election night.
The author is particularly interested in the persistence of corporatism as the characteristic form of state rule, despite the transformation of the economy from state-capitalism to neoliberal-capitalism.
This characteristic form suggests that the animals could muster an extremely powerful bite.
The alkaloids in ragwort are very potent hepatotoxins and cause a characteristic form of liver damage which is irreversible and untreatable.
In other words, with the advent in recent decades of artistic criticism as a characteristic form of labor relations--to borrow Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello's phrase for the articulated desire for an authentic, nonalienated life based on creativity and nondependence on the Fordist prototype (with a boss and fixed working hours)--people are no longer forced to behave as they once were.
The product poses a risk of choking because, due to its characteristic form, appearance, colour, size and smell, the product may be mistaken for a foodstuff.
Between 1790 and 1950 the characteristic form of mission activity was institution-building.
Despite a characteristic form, specific DNA probing is usually applied for faster definitive identification (12).
The diagrammatic spiral is the subsumed vertebrae which give the animal its characteristic form, but the story does not end with this unifying gesture.
He explores sacred ritual, which leads him to the hymn as "the most characteristic form of sacred song," to Augustine's definition of a hymn as a "song of praise to God," and from there (somehow) to a translation of Augustine into "modern anthropological concepts of belief content and ritual process" (7).
Over the course of American history" the Catholic discipline of the confessional and the Protestant tradition of mutual admonition have given way to this religious self-reliance that achieves its most characteristic form in evangelical Protestantism.

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