characteristic temperature

characteristic temperature

[‚kar·ik·tə′ris·tik ′tem·prə·chər]
(solid-state physics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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where, [sigma](T) = conductivity at temperature T, [[sigma].sub.0] = limiting conductivity at infinite temperature, and [T.sub.0] = Mott's characteristic temperature related to the hopping process of charge carriers among the localized states of different energies by thermal activation.
The characteristic temperature, pressure and stoichiometric mixture of iso-octane and air were used as the input conditions for the calculations.
The above number for the characteristic temperature [T.sup.*] must be compared with [k.sub.B][T.sub.Room] = 25meV.
where [T.sub.a] is the characteristic temperature of air thermal conductivity coefficient, while [T.sub.1] and [T.sub.2] are the top and bottom temperature, respectively:
Typically, water may contain several types of impurity, from dust particles to dissolved salts and bacteria, each of which triggers freezing at a characteristic temperature.
From the [C.sub.ij], we calculated the Debye characteristic temperature, the Gruneisen parameter, and various sound velocities.
With the isotropic assumption, the characteristic temperature distribution should be independent of direction.
(Note both of these temperatures are in degrees Kelvin.) To is the characteristic temperature for data retention that embodies dielectric, field strength and charge loss effects.
Each PCR product-probe complex melts at a characteristic temperature, and with simple hybridization probes, the melting occurs at a characteristic temperature that can be used to distinguish the product from others.
That record can be modified or completely reset if the material is heated above a characteristic temperature known as its Curie temperature.
The antenna supports greater changes in temperature since there is no di-electric with its characteristic temperature co-efficient of expansion, which differs from that of the metallization.
When heated above a characteristic temperature, the individual molecules are free to flow under the action of an applied force, such that items can be formed by a wide range of fluid flow processes.

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