charged particle


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charged particle

[′chärjd ′pärd·ə·kəl]
(particle physics)
A particle whose charge is not zero; the charge of a particle is added to its designation as a superscript, with particles of charge +1 and -1 (in terms of the charge of the proton) denoted by + and - respectively; for example, π+, Σ-.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research.
Nandi, "Charged particle, photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions," Advances in High Energy Physics, vol.
In the stochastic electrodynamics approach, the equation of motion of the charged particle in the zeropoint field is known as Brafford-Marshall equation [13] which is simply the Abraham-Lorentz [22] equation of motion of a charged particle of mass m and charge e and it is given by
Lorentz is an easy-to-use solver for analysing charged particle trajectories in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.
Charged particle irradiation of chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull and cervical spine: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory experience.
The charged particle moving with the velocity v induces magnetic field H wrapped around its path.
Charged particles are forced to travel along the magnetic field lines that snake throughout space.
"If we were judging by the charged particle data alone, I would have thought we were outside the heliosphere," said Stamatios Krimigis, principal investigator of the low-energy charged particle instrument, based at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.
PHOTONIS' series of Stripline Microchannel Plates (MCPs) can capture sequential images of charged particle events at high speeds, making them useful diagnostic tools for documenting nuclear events during energy research and process development.
"You may say that neither throwing a stone nor throwing a charged particle through the cloak is a big deal," he says.
The solenoid has been designed to have a slight (9.5[degrees]) bend in the magnetic field direction at one end allowing the decay proton and electron to be guided out of the beam and into a charged particle detector held at a high negative potential ([approximately equal to] -30 kV) to accelerate the low energy protons to detectable energies.
The cloud is polarized, meaning that the strong negative charge at the core "pushes" the negatively charged particle in a pair slightly farther away from the core than the positively charged particle.