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chart,

term referring to mapsmap,
conventionalized representation of spatial phenomena on a plane surface. Unlike photographs, maps are selective and may be prepared to show various quantitative and qualitative facts, including boundaries, physical features, patterns, and distribution.
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 prepared for marine navigation and for air navigation. All charts show, in some convenient scalescale,
in cartography, the ratio of the distance between two points on a map to the real distance between the two corresponding points portrayed. The scale may be expressed in three ways: numerically, as a ratio or a fraction, e.g., 1:100,000 or 1-100,000; verbally, e.g.
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, geographic features useful to the navigator, as well as indications of direction, e.g., true north (the direction of the geographic North Pole), magnetic north (the direction indicated by the north-seeking end of a magnetic compass needle), and magnetic declination (the difference between these two directions). Data shown on marine charts include the outline and nature of coasts, with landmarks; currents and undercurrents (both direction and force); winds; tides; location and type of lighthouses, buoys, beacons, and lightships; position of rocks, bars, reefs, shoals, wrecks, or other dangers; contour and nature of bottom (mud, sand, rock, or gravel); and depth. Depth is indicated in great detail in harbors and shallow and intricate waterways; the value indicated is usually that at mean low water. Most national governments publish charts of their coasts and harbors; the British admiralty has done the most work along these lines. In the United States the Coast and Geodetic Survey and the Hydrographic Office of the Dept. of the Navy issue charts; these are drawn using the gnomonic or Mercator map projectionsmap projection,
transfer of the features of the surface of the earth or another spherical body onto a flat sheet of paper. Only a globe can represent accurately the shape, orientation, and relative area of the earth's surface features; any projection produces distortion with
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. Aeronautical charts show natural or constructed surface features by the use of various symbols. These charts give locations of radio-navigation stations and graphic representations of the directional information they broadcast; radio communication channels of airports and spacecraft centers; standard flight paths; and dangerous or forbidden areas (e.g., certain military installations). Elevations on the earth's surface are indicated by contour lines. The U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey issues many kinds of aeronautical charts. The Nippon Foundation–General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans Seabed 2030 Project, begun in 2017, aims to produce a modern map of the entire ocean floor.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

chart

[chärt]
(mapping)
A map, generally designed for navigation or other particular purposes, in which essential map information is combined with various other data critical to the intended use.
To prepare a chart or to engage in a charting operation.
(mathematics)
An n-chart is a pair (U, h), where U is an open set of a topological space and h is a homeomorphism of U onto an open subset of n-dimensional Euclidean space.
(science and technology)
A form, such as a graph, table, or diagram, which gives information about some variable quantity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chart

A map representing a given surface of the earth and specially designed for sea or air navigation. Aeronautical charts, in which only coastlines, some contours, water, woods, and some aeronautical information (including air routes and airfields) are shown, are the most commonly used. (see page 144)
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

chart

1. a map designed to aid navigation by sea or air
2. an outline map, esp one on which weather information is plotted
3. a sheet giving graphical, tabular, or diagrammatical information
4. another name for graph
5. Astrology another word for horoscope
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Part 4 topics include "Standard Celeration Charting and SAFMEDS," and "Chart shares." The chapter describing SAFMEDS shows how a university instructor could use them in a course on Standard Celeration Charting.
First Healthcare Products has been a major supplier of Patient Charting Systems and Supplies for nearly 30 years.
The nuts and bolts consist of the actual pitching and charting. As we have stated, our two indoor mounds allow us to work with four pitchers - two doing the throwing and the other two doing the charting.
Charting is depicting an idea or a set of ideas in the pictorial form of a drawing or a chart.
This Windows-based software includes "brainstorming" sections, cause-and-effect diagramming, data collection, flow charting, and various other charting capabilities - including Pareto charts, scatter diagrams, and box plots.
The change could be an update to charting criteria (how things are depicted) or clarification of wording, but frequently the change is based on a D-NOTAM.
Nuance's recognition of Lightning Charts supports the goal of Lightning Charts to deliver software products that enhance all aspects of ED charting.
Also announced recently is the release of JClass DesktopViews 6.2, a comprehensive collection of client-side Java components, with charting enhancements and support for the latest JDKs and IDEs.
We initiate our self-scouting by charting the plays and establishing the pass/run ratio.
The technique, known as median/individual (M/I) control charting, was developed specifically to address problems associated with "family" manufacturing processes--i.e., multiple similar or identical-member processes sharing a common source.