chartreuse

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chartreuse

chartreuse (shärtro͞ozˈ), liqueur made exclusively by Carthusians at their monastery, La Grande Chartreuse, France, until their expulsion in 1903. The French distillery and trademark were sold, and the order set up a new plant in Tarragona, Spain. The monks' product is identified by the name Liqueur des Pères Chartreux. Readmitted to France in 1941, the Carthusians resumed manufacture there. Green chartreuse contains about 57% alcohol; the sweeter yellow variety, about 43%.

Chartreuse, Grande

Chartreuse, Grande (gräNd shärtrözˈ), mountainous massif, Isère dept., SE France, in the Dauphiné Alps; Chamechaude Peak (6,847 ft/2,087 m) is the highest point. There in a high valley St. Bruno founded (1084) the famous monastery, La Grande Chartreuse, the principal seat of the Carthusians until 1903, when the order was expelled from France. The Carthusians returned to their monastery in 1941. The monastery was destroyed several times; the present buildings (now a museum) date mainly from the 17th cent. Chartreuse liqueur originated there.
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chartreuse

A monastery of the Carthusian monks, esp. in France.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chartreuse

1. either of two liqueurs, green or yellow, made from herbs and flowers
2. 
a. a colour varying from a clear yellowish-green to a strong greenish-yellow
b. (as adjective): a chartreuse dress
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
She and her staff are constantly explaining falernum, Galliano, Chartreuse and Fernet Branca to guests, and it's invigorating when customers make a connection to these special bottles, Kim says.
(63) Dora Augustin Devaux, "Premier chapitre pour une histoire des moniales chartreuses," in Etudes et documents pour l'histoire des Chartreux, Analecta cartusiana 208 (Salzburg: Institut fur Anglistik und Amerikanistik, 2003) 1-42, at 4.
: Rapport de Philippe Howard, Cardinal de Norfolk, sur le rit de la consecration des vierges chez les moniales chartreuses (chartreuse de Premol, 1687).
(80) Ray and Mouton, "Chartreuses (regle des moniales)."
Bruno of Cologne, who began the first charterhouse in 1084 in the valley of the Chartreuse Mountains in the French Alps.