chauvinism

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chauvinism

(shō`vənĭzəm), word derived from the name of Nicolas Chauvin, a soldier of the First French Empire. Used first for a passionate admiration of Napoleon, it now expresses exaggerated and aggressive nationalism. As a social phenomenon, chauvinism is essentially modern, becoming marked in the era of acute national rivalries and imperialism beginning in the 19th cent. It has been encouraged by mass communication, originally by the cheap newspaper. Chauvinism exalts consciousness of nationality, spreads hatred of minorities and other nations, and is associated with militarism, imperialism, and racism. In the 1960s, the term "male chauvinist" appeared in the women's liberation movement; it is applied to males who refuse to regard females as equals.

Chauvinism

 

an extreme form of nationalism, involving the advocacy of national exclusivity. Chauvinists place the interests of their own nation above the interests of all others, promote national arrogance, and exacerbate national hatreds and animosities.

The term “chauvinism” first appeared in France. It derives from the name of an aggressive and bellicose recruit in the comedy The Tricolor Cockade (1831), by the brothers J.-H. and C.-T. Cogniard. The recruit, Nicolas Chauvin, was apparently based on a real Nicolas Chauvin, a veteran of the Napoleonic Wars who was known for his worship of Napoleon and his belief that the emperor had made France great.

The word “chauvinism” was eventually applied to many types of exaggerated nationalism. “Jingoism” came into use in Great Britain in the 1870’s as a synonym. Terms such as “social chauvinism” and “great power chauvinism” have been devised to identify particular types of chauvinism.

Chauvinism flourishes in imperialist countries. Its most extreme manifestation is the antihuman ideology and policies of fascist states. The struggle against chauvinist ideologies and their proponents has always been one of the most important tasks confronting Marxist-Leninist parties.

REFERENCES

Lenin, V. I. “Rabochii klass i natsional’nyi vopros.” Poln. sobr. soch., 5th ed., vol. 23.
Lenin, V. I. “Kriticheskie zametki po natsional’nomu voprosu.” Ibid., vol. 24.
Lenin, V. I. “O bor’be s sotsial-shovinizmom.” Ibid. , vol.
26. Lenin, V. I. “Prikrytie sotsial-shovinistskoi politiki internatsionalisticheskimi frazami.” Ibid., vol. 27.
Marksizm-Leninizm o proletarskom internatsionalizme. Moscow, 1969.
Leninizm i natsional’nyi vopros v sovremennykh usloviiakh, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1974.

Chauvinism

See also Bigotry, Patriotism.
Chauvin, Nicolas
soldier who passionately admired Napoleon; whence, ultranationalism. [Fr. Hist.: NCE, 518]
Helmer, Torvald
treats wife Nora as an inferior being. [Nor. Lit.: A Doll’s House]
Jingo
legendary second-century empress of Japan, victorious invader of Korea and hence the conjectural eponym of jingoism. [Jap. Hist.: EB (1963) XIII, 69]
Jingoes
nickname of 19th-century English pro-war party. [Br. Hist.: EB (1963) XIII, 69]
male chauvinist pig
denigrating designation for a man who treats women as inferiors. [Am. Pop. Culture: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
26) While Adorno certainly does at times chauvinistically advocate certain forms of European art over others, Aesthetic Theory also notes that the "spirit of artworks is not their meaning and not their intention, but rather their truth content, or, in other words, the truth that is revealed through them.
In a time period when it would be convenient to chauvinistically focus on a "patriotic" (or better yet, jingoistic) tone, you have chosen to focus on the multicultural perspectives that make up our world.
And when he planned to say Britain was "the last place in Europe any man or woman would want to fall sick", he chauvinistically left out "woman".
But if you define progress less chauvinistically - if you let the animals bring their own definition-you will find progress, in a genuinely interesting sense of the word, nearly everywhere.
Caldwell thought the regime chauvinistically anti-Vietnamese; for their part, the guides thought him far too curious about the fate of Buddhism.
The problem is that many people naively assume that sufficient similarities exist between cultures such that good intentions are enough to understand one another, or chauvinistically expect "the other" to operate from their own linguistic and cultural frameworks.
Today, we might speak, somewhat less chauvinistically, of a "Renaissance person" as one who is both intellectually knowledgeable and manually skilled in many, or ideally all, of the known arts and sciences.
Joey August handles "as much or more in varietals from Washington as from California," and Halvorson boasts a bit chauvinistically, "they're a little better in the Rieslings and Chenin blancs.
This doesn't excuse the Irish for doing what comes naturally, or chauvinistically, since it happens everywhere; but perhaps Foster acts as if he has discovered the Irish fabrications in the popular "historical" works of A.