loose

(redirected from cheap money)
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Related to cheap money: fiat money, Dear money

loose

1. 
a. (of the bowels) emptying easily, esp excessively; lax
b. (of a cough) accompanied by phlegm, mucus, etc.
2. the loose Rugby the part of play when the forwards close round the ball in a ruck or loose scrum
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The head of Germany's largest commercial bank warned of the fallout from cheap money, cautioning against using the strong euro as a justification for printing more.
While cheap money remains a key factor in valuation build up, there are no signs of drastic policy action that will be taken to cool the markets in the near future, thanks to the persisting low growth low inflation environment, according to analysts.
Monetary policy has stayed too loose for too long, but that is not primarily a failure of central banks - it is a failure of politicians, who have avoided the spending commitments and deeper economic reforms, painful at first, that would wean us off cheap money. It is a failure of markets too, which freak out if denied their dose of easy money.
Now, however, the equity houses of cards, built on trillions of digital dollars, are not worth the paper they're not printed on and can no longer be supported by cheap money policy.
In other words, the cheap money drug will keep dominating the market for a while longer, but will be administered in smaller doses.
However, some investors point to a risk that the end of cheap money could affect smaller US companies.
The irony of a Jewish bank raising cheap money from Muslim investors shows once again that "money" has no political boundaries.
The Royal Court confiscation hearing was centred around cocaine trafficking evidence between 1991 and 1996, with a covert wiretap supposedly recording Warren bragging of knowing a cheap money launderer who "cleaned" PS10m/ PS15m a week of his drugs cash being key to the case.
Emerging economies have benefited from cheap money as three rounds of Federal Reserve bond-buying pushed capital into their borders in search of higher returns.
It appears that the prospect of the end of cheap money in the west, with the near certainty of the end of even cheaper money in China, is forcing the cost of capital up across the emerging markets.
Many others, including Tata Motor's sister company Tata Steel, which paid $11.3 billion for Corus Steel in 2007, have struggled with acquisitions made in Europe and the United States in the era of cheap money before the financial crisis.