chemical weathering

chemical weathering

[′kem·i·kəl ′weth·ə·riŋ]
(geochemistry)
A weathering process whereby rocks and minerals are transformed into new, fairly stable chemical combinations by such chemical reactions as hydrolysis, oxidation, ion exchange, and solution. Also known as decay; decomposition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ice sheets which cover about 10 percent of our Earth's land surface at present, were thought 20 years ago to be frozen wastelands, devoid of life and with supressed chemical weathering - irrelevant parts of the carbon cycle.
Kaolin is a natural clay formed by the chemical weathering of aluminum silicate minerals such as felspars through a complex sequence of events.
Chemical weathering was evaluated using the chemical index of alteration (CIA).
The intense chemical weathering is established by the high CIA (Chemical Index for Alteration) values.
Chemical weathering plays a significant role in the effectiveness of agrominerals as fertilisers in agricultural practices (Harley and Gilkes 2000; Van Straaten 2006).
Plants play a major role in the chemical weathering of continental rocks.
As on Earth, chemical weathering and hydrothermal reactions can change minerals in rock from dry to water-bearing.
Li and Wu [7] performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis on clay minerals and found that the chemical weathering in this area was obvious, and significant development of clay minerals was observed in the weathered rock.
Over a period of time, this process - known as chemical weathering - cooled the planet back down, and ushered in another ice age.
Bulk changes produced by weathering in granitic rocks have been studied by several methods, including chemical weathering indices.
This process, called "chemical weathering," effectively sends dissolved remnants of rocks--my time capsules--into the Fraser.
The effects of chemical weathering of sedimentary rocks were described by Chigira and Oyama [5].

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