chemist


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chemist

1. Brit a shop selling medicines, cosmetics, etc.
2. Brit a qualified dispenser of prescribed medicines
3. a person studying, trained in, or engaged in chemistry
4. an obsolete word for alchemist

What does it mean when you dream about a chemist?

A chemist in a dream can represent a doctor or a therapist. It could represent research one needs to undertake. One’s inner wisdom. Alternatively, a form of negative knowledge, as in the stereotype of the evil scientist.

chemist

[′kem·əst]
(chemistry)
A scientist specializing in chemistry.

chemist

(jargon)
(Cambridge) Someone who wastes computer time on number crunching when you'd far rather the computer were working out anagrams of your name or printing Snoopy calendars or running life patterns. May or may not refer to someone who actually studies chemistry.
References in classic literature ?
The officer had got no further than the 'You shall well and truly try,' when he was again interrupted by the chemist.
'I am to be sworn, my Lord, am I?' said the chemist.
'Very well, my Lord,' replied the chemist, in a resigned manner.
The Analytical Chemist returning, everybody looks at him.
Mrs Veneering has just succeeded in waking Lady Tippins from a snore, by dexterously shunting a train of plates and dishes at her knuckles across the table; when everybody but Mortimer himself becomes aware that the Analytical Chemist is, in a ghostly manner, offering him a folded paper.
Mortimer, in spite of all the arts of the chemist, placidly refreshes himself with a glass of Madeira, and remains unconscious of the Document which engrosses the general attention, until Lady Tippins (who has a habit of waking totally insensible), having remembered where she is, and recovered a perception of surrounding objects, says: 'Falser man than Don Juan; why don't you take the note from the commendatore?' Upon which, the chemist advances it under the nose of Mortimer, who looks round at him, and says:
The chemist recommended various remedies which were in vogue fifteen years since.
"I have always found Laudanum relieve the pain better than anything else," she said, trifling with the bottles on the counter, and looking at them while she spoke, instead of looking at the chemist. "Let me have some Laudanum."
The chemist bowed; and, turning to his shelves, filled an ordinary half-ounce bottle with laudanum immediately.
There are as many elixirs of every kind as there are caprices and peculiarities in the physical and moral nature of humanity; and I will say further -- the art of these chemists is capable with the utmost precision to accommodate and proportion the remedy and the bane to yearnings for love or desires for vengeance."
"It is very fortunate," she observed, "that such substances could only be prepared by chemists; otherwise, all the world would be poisoning each other."
"By chemists and persons who have a taste for chemistry," said Monte Cristo carelessly.