chemurgy


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

chemurgy

(kĕm`ərjē), branch of applied chemistry concerned with preparing industrial products from agricultural raw materials. Among such products are plastics manufactured from casein and soybean; soaps derived from animal and vegetable fats; cellulose fiber products made from, for example, straws, stubble, cobs, and hulls; and starches derived from surplus grains. Chemurgy is a wide-ranging discipline involving chemistry, genetics, bacteriology, and physics.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

chemurgy

[′ke·mər·jē]
(chemical engineering)
A branch of chemistry concerned with the profitable utilization of organic raw materials, especially agricultural products, for nonfood purposes such as for paints and varnishes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1938, well into the farm chemurgy movement, the U.S.
In the 1920s and 1930s there was a significant drive to help American farmers by making industrial products from agricultural byproducts, known as the chemurgy movement.
This was, perhaps, the beginning of biotech, termed "chemurgy" at the time.
(Southfield, MI; www.lear.com), this undertaking, farm chemurgy, which involves using chemistry and other scientific processes to transform farm crops to industry products, is something that is being taken very seriously at Lear as they work toward more environmentally sound products and processes.