chessboard


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chessboard

a square board divided into 64 squares of two alternating colours, used for playing chess or draughts
References in periodicals archive ?
Firstly we present new formulations of the N queens' configuration problem as optimization problems and secondly we modify a derivative free method so that it may be able to find the optimal configuration of the chessboard.
To calculate focal length, distortion coefficients and undistort the input image, Zhang [10] method has been used with known chessboard size and square side length in millimeters.
Imagine an arbitrarily large chessboard where some of the squares are labelled with distinct letters of the alphabet.
A friend was captain of the chess team, but Barrasso, completely blind since birth, had no idea what a chessboard was.
The creator of the tequila bottle inspired chessboard tabletop is Lt.
All of them can be characterised as mathematical problems on a chessboard.
Kampala: Sitting in a dimly lit room in the run-down Kampala suburb of Katwe, Phiona Mutesi stares fixedly at the chessboard in front of her as she ponders the next move in her improbable journey.
The game will take place on a chessboard approximately five by five metres, with the opponent calling out what chess piece they want to move on the board.
AN amber and silver chessboard that King Charles I is thought to have taken to his execution has sold for a record [euro]620,000.
On Sunday, Mohammad Mansha went flat out to set a new record for making chapati breads mixing, kneading, spinning and cooking three in three minutes and 14 seconds while 12-year-old Mehek Gul took just 45 seconds to arrange the pieces on a chessboard using only one hand.
The topics include making chess politically and socially relevant in times of trouble in the Schacktavelslek, games and governance in 12th-century England, images of medieval Spanish chess and captive damsels in distress, how the queen went mad, the chessboard as a mnemonic tool in medieval didactic literature, and the limits of allegory in Jacobus de Cessolis' De lude scaccorum.