region

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region

1. an area considered as a unit for geographical, functional, social, or cultural reasons
2. an administrative division of a country
3. (in Scotland from 1975 until 1996) any of the nine territorial divisions into which the mainland of Scotland was divided for purposes of local government; replaced in 1996 by council areas

Region

 

(1) A territory identified by certain characteristics or peculiarities. In many cases, a taxonomic unit, as in physico-geographical region.

(2) In certain countries outside the USSR, an administrative and territorial unit, as in Paris region.

region

[′rē·jən]
(computer science)
A group of machine addresses which refer to a base address.
(mathematics)
The union of an open connected set with a subset of its boundary points (which may be the entire boundary or the empty set).
References in periodicals archive ?
The above benefits lead to revival of this conveniently available, supraclavicular artery flap in head, neck, and facial, oral and upper chest region defect coverage.
This flap since its revival in the early 90s has been used at numerous location in head and neck, oral, base of the skull and upper chest region.
When shooting simple one- and two-shot drills from Low Ready, I would continually see officers either under- or over-shoot the high chest region of the target as they tried to raise and stop their two-pound gun from a position pointing at the ground.
After pre-fatiguing the chest region with the bent-arm fly, the athlete can further exhaust the pecs through several multi-joint movements - bench press, decline press, incline press, push-ups, or dips, depending upon the available equipment.
Named the Primary Neutralization Zone target Series, it is a progressive system that requires the shooter to focus harder while building skills in order to hit the 73/4x8-inch high chest region that extends up into the neck and head and is known as the PNZ.
The NCP Pulse Generator is implanted in the upper left chest region, and attached to the vagus nerve via the NCP lead.
This target has two steel paddles that are eight inches square, a striking area that is similar to the high chest region of the human body.
X-ray evaluations of pelvis, lumbar and chest regions were unremarkable for visualized fracture, dislocation or gross pathology.