chiasma

(redirected from chiasms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

chiasma

(kīăz`mə): see crossing overcrossing over,
process in genetics by which the two chromosomes of a homologous pair exchange equal segments with each other. Crossing over occurs in the first division of meiosis. At that stage each chromosome has replicated into two strands called sister chromatids.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

chiasma

[kī′az·mə]
(anatomy)
A cross-shaped point of intersection of two parts, especially of the optic nerves.
(cell and molecular biology)
The point of junction and fusion between paired chromatids or chromosomes, first seen during diplotene of meiosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
He writes, "There is double and crossed situating of the visible in the tangible and of the tangible in the visible; the two maps are complete, and yet they do not merge into one." (44) Merleau-Ponty argues that the chiasm of sight and touch pulls the world into my own body, so that I make a world for myself, and it also pulls me out of my singular body, into a shared and anonymous visibility and sensibility.
In The Tree of Life, the juxtaposition of trees and water exemplify the chiasm of visibility and tactility; the shared 'flesh' of the world, that is, the element of the world's shared visibility and sensibility constitutes a connected world through which pulses the contradictory but connected ways of nature and grace.
The Tree of Life captures the insignificant singularity of one small family, and its eternal significance, because Jack and his mother and father repeat the connected chiasm of galaxies and dinosaurs, and because their unique and tiny lament at the loss of their brother and son is remembered and reconciled, eternally, on the rolling waves of God's forgiving grace.
(43) Though Deleuze is often thought to critique the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty, the latter's notions of chiasm and flesh can be aligned with a Deleuzian ontology rather easily.
But, in view of the interest that the enigma of meeting arouses across a wide range of disciplines and practices--from dance to design, from theories of society to theories of consciousness, from ethics to politics and back again--couldn't we with equal justification speak of a "chi complex" haunting the human and social sciences, one incarnate in the word chiasm and the constellation of terms associated with it?
Complex chiasms appear in many different structural shapes in the Bible, and one of the most basic forms is the chiastic inclusion, or ABA.
Apart from the parallelisms Shakespeare uses for building blocks in this short speech, he frequently composes complex chiasms that operate on multiple structural levels simultaneously.
[Brutus/effect; apex] C: There is tears [Brutus/effect; apex and reversal] B: for his love; [Caesar/cause; note the internal chiasms:] [lov'd--weep : tears--love] C: joy [Brutus/effect] B: for his fortune; [Caesar/cause; fortunate--rejoice : joy--fortune] C: honor [Brutus/effect] B: for his valor; [Caesar/cause; valiant--honor : honor--valor] C: and death [Brutus/effect] B: for his ambition.
Cade's speech is a good illustration of the basic mode of repetition Shakespeare employs in many of his earliest chiasms. The repetition of the key phrases "this word 'sallet'" and "the word 'sallet,'" along with "many a time" and "many a time," forms the structural spine of the overall system, but these phrases lack the imagination and variation of later chiasms and merely meet the basic requirements of the structural form.
While Shakespeare writes complex chiasms in this form throughout all his plays, it is important to recognize that the earliest texts still contain a higher frequency of complex chiastic systems written with this regimented approach.
The final portion of this speech also happens to be another chiasm, which balances the opening chiasms in lines 175-76: Romeo (line 182): This love feel I that feel no love in this.