chief cell

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chief cell

[¦chēf ′sel]
(histology)
A parenchymal, secretory cell of the parathyroid gland.
A cell in the lumen of the gastric fundic glands.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Normally, an intact muscularis externa, submucosa, and gastric mucosa will reflect the presence of chief cells found just above the submucosa occupying one-fourth of the entire gastric mucosa.
Regression analysis was done as the appropriate statistical method to observe the dependence of various parameters, such as number and diameter of chief cells and oxyphil cells with age.
We detected intracellular localization of this major pathogenicity factor of HP in parietal cells but found no positivity in chief cells. In addition, we noted obvious VacA/HP positivity in the lumen of gastric glands and the gastric lumen.
The basal layer of the glandular part was predominantly occupied by the chief cells (CC), intermingling with a few parietal cells (PC).
Fragmentation of gastric mucosa, dissolution of cellular outlines and collapsed chief cells are few, visible characteristics.
Cytoplasmic and nuclear acidophilic inclusion bodies were detected in respiratory epithelial cells, gastric surface mucous and chief cells, intestinal crypt epithelial cells, and hepatic and pancreatic duct epithelial cells.
(4) The tumor is composed of 2 cell types: chief cells, which have pale eosinophilic cytoplasm, round to oval nuclei, and finely granular chromatin, and sustentacular cells, which have spindled-shaped nuclei and scant cytoplasm (Figure 3).
1B), and gland cells consisted of parietal cells and a small amount of chief cells. The larger parietal cells, with small and round nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm, dispersed in the mucous cells.
Oxyphil cells, being less numerous than chief cells, were distinguished by their dark eosinophilic, granular cytoplasm.
Histologically, there is usually a single mass, which is most often composed of chief cells that are surrounded by an uninvolved or atrophic rim of parathyroid tissue (figure 1), with or without a separating fibrous connective tissue capsule.
Chief cells normally produce digestive fluids for the stomach.
The other elements of the fundic glands, parietal and chief cells, were present in variable numbers in the cardia-type mucosa.

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