child process


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child process

[′chīld ‚präs·es]
(computer science)
One of the subsidiary processes that branches out from the root task in the fork-join model of programming on parallel machines.

child process

(operating system)
A process created by another process (the parent process). Each process may create many child processes but will have only one parent process, except for the very first process which has no parent. The first process, called init in Unix, is started by the kernel at boot time and never terminates. A child process inherits most of its attributes, such as open files, from its parent. In fact in Unix, a child process is created (using fork) as a copy of the parent. The chid process can then overlay itself with a different program (using exec) as required.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parent process protection (known as Debug Blocker in Windows protectors) starts protected program as a child process and attaches to it for debug.
Part five discusses process, child process, events, buffer, and stream modules.
Listening to a child re-examine the experience in a nonjudgmental, supportive manner helps the child process the event, an important step toward recovery.
When the AC executes, it starts the application child process using the DyninstAPI library.