chilled iron


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chilled iron

[′child ′ī·ərn]
(metallurgy)
Cast iron made in iron- or steel-faced molds so the surface of the casting cools rapidly, retaining most of the carbon and becoming white and hard.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chilled iron abrasive held in a four-tonne silo with twin outlets is used to provide a high-quality surface that is regular, clean and rust-free in order to optimise the long-term performance of the final paint finish.
However, chilled iron was brittle and it was difficult to keep the castings from warping during the chilling process.
The blastroom was introduced primarily for the blast cleaning with chilled iron grit (G24) of turbine casings, which can measure up to 1.82 metres (10ft) in diameter, and other large turbine components, but it also features an integral chamber, which was specially designed to house metal spraying equipment.
Regardless of the type of abrasive used, whether chilled iron, malleable iron or steel, abrasive consumption increases as the size of particle removed by the separator increases.
A wide variety of different abrasives can be used to suit the material involved and the effect required, including aluminium oxide, chilled iron, stainless steel shot and glass beads.
If wear-resistant chilled iron microstructure is desirable, like in automotive camshaft applications, FPM in the surfaces of eccentrics won't be lined, and solidified iron is exposed directly to the permanent mold.
The efficiency of the recovery system has enabled Cementation to use relatively expensive chilled iron abrasive and still make big savings in abrasive costs compared with the company's previous procedures.
For example, it didn't take long for chilled iron car wheels, cast iron engine blocks and heads, soil pipe, and ingot mold markets to deteriorate.
The chilled iron abrasive used quickly cleans the equipment to bare metal and can be recycled many times.
The area from the apex of the wedge to the end of the white area is designated as "clear chill." From the end of the clear chill to the area where the last spot of white iron is visible is called the "mottled zone." The "total chill" is measured from the junction of the gray fracture to the first indication of chilled iron.