chimney effect

chimney effect

[′chim‚nē i′fekt]
(fluid mechanics)
The tendency of air or gas in a vertical passage to rise when it is heated because its density is lower than that of the surrounding air or gas.

chimney effect, flue effect, stack effect

The tendency of air or gas in a shaft or other vertical passage to rise when heated, owing to its lower density compared with that of the surrounding air or gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
It started under the stairs and travelled upwards, like a chimney effect.
Pal chose the rocky hillside on the west side of Prescott after surveying 200 sites throughout Arizona, He wanted to build a home as tall as possible, to create the chimney effect that is paramount to the natural heating and cooling of the home, while providing the most amazing views.
Any domestic property where you have a stairwell, if you've got a fire downstairs, you've got what's called the chimney effect.
Waterproof storm vents allow for the active circulation of air even in the wettest conditions, with side and front and back yoke vents creating a chimney effect that allows cool air in and humid air to escape.
The holes will create] a chimney effect because it will be very hot and it will rise through the opening.
The candle generates a soft suction which creates a chimney effect vibrating the air near the ear drum and so giving it a gentle massage.
Chimney effect creates pressure and the hot gas is transported through the height difference.
The objective was to improve the chimney effect to remove the heat which accumulates under the carbon fibre-reinforced cladding while optimising air supply in the process, a statement said.
As with Jeffrey Gray, a prosecution expert who gave evidence last week, Reed described the chimney effect caused by the gap between the stairs acting as a conduit for the fire on the ground floor, allowing it to travel quickly to the second floor.
By unstable he means that warm air masses rise, creating a kind of chimney effect that pulls smoke and burning embers high, which contributes to the spot fires that jump beyond fire lines.
Flames rapidly spread - drawn upstairs by the chimney effect of an open top-floor window - and by the time Mrs Spence was woken by the smoke, the house was already ablaze and filling with dense smoke, Mr MacDonald told the jury.