chimney

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chimney

1. Geology
a. a cylindrical body of an ore, which is usually oriented vertically
b. the vent of a volcano
2. Mountaineering a vertical fissure large enough for a person's body to enter
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Chimney

A vertical noncombustible structure, containing one or more flues to carry smoke from the fireplaces to the outside, usually rising above the roof.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chimney

 

a vertical pipe for discharging into the atmosphere gaseous products of fuel combustion from boiler units or industrial and space-heating furnaces.

In small central-heating boilers and furnaces chimneys are designed to create a natural draft, under the influence of which air for fuel combustion enters into the firebox and flue gases are discharged. In large boiler installations natural draft is replaced by a forced draft produced though flue gas pumps. Health standards require that the greater the hourly fuel consumption and the greater the ash and sulfur content, the higher the chimney must be. A chimney consists of a foundation, base, and shaft. The inner surface of the shaft is protected by a fire-resistant brick lining. Chimney sizes (height and diameter of the mouth) in the USSR have been standardized. Brick chimneys are made with heights up to 120 m and diameters of 0.75-8 m; reinforced-concrete chimneys are up to 300 m in height and 10 m in diameter; steel sheet chimneys (thickness of 3-15 mm) are not more than 40 m in height and 0.4-1 m in diameter.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a chimney?

Chimneys are often associated with cultural implications of Santa Claus arriving to reward those who have been good with gifts. They also symbolize the warmth and cheer of family as in the traditional “home-sweet-home” scene on the front of greeting cards, gifts of candies, and food and homemade items of every description featuring the smoking brick chimney.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

chimney

[′chim‚nē]
(building construction)
A vertical, hollow structure of masonry, steel, or concrete, built to convey gaseous products of combustion from a building.
(electronics)
A pipelike enclosure that is placed over a heat sink to improve natural upward convection of heat and thereby increase the dissipating ability of the sink.
(geology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chimney

A vertical hollow structure of masonry, steel, or reinforced concrete, built to convey gaseous products of combustion from a building or process facility. A chimney should be high enough to furnish adequate draft and to discharge the products of combustion without causing local air pollution. The height and diameter of a chimney determine the draft. For adequate draft, small industrial boilers and home heating systems depend entirely upon the enclosed column of hot gas. In contrast, stacks, which are chimneys for large power plants and process facilities, usually depend upon force-draft fans and induced-draft fans to produce the draft necessary for operation, and the chimney is used only for removal of the flue gas. See Fan

For fire safety, chimneys for residential construction and for small buildings must extend at least 3 ft (0.9 m) above the level where they pass through the roof and at least 2 ft (0.6 m) higher than any ridge within 10 ft (3 m) of them. Some stacks extend as high as 500 ft (150 m) above ground level, thus providing supplementary natural draft.

A chimney or stack must be designed to withstand lateral loads from wind pressure or seismic forces (earthquakes), as well as vertical loads from its own weight. Small chimneys used in residential construction are commonly made of brick or unreinforced masonry, while stacks are usually made of steel. Tall steel chimneys of small diameter cannot economically be made self-supporting and must be guyed. Concrete chimneys may be plain or reinforced. Except for rectangular flues and chimneys commonly used in residential construction, masonry chimneys are usually constructed of perforated radial brick molded to suit the diameter of the chimney. See Brick, Loads, dynamic, Masonry, Mortar, Reinforced concrete, Truss

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chimney

chimney
An incombustible vertical structure containing one or more flues to provide draft for fireplaces, and to carry off gaseous products of combustion to the outside air from fireplaces, furnaces, or boilers. Also see clay-and-sticks
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It had the effect of immediately diverting all eyes to the chimney, except those of John Willet, who finding himself as it were, caught in the fact, and not being (as has been already observed) of a very ready nature, remained staring at his guest in a particularly awkward and disconcerted manner.
Charley and I made our lucky up the wash-us chimney, and Bolter got into the empty water-butt, head downwards; but his legs were so precious long that they stuck out at the top, and so they took him too.'
Rouletabille, who was ferreting in the chimney, put his fingers into one of the crucibles.
"Of Madame L'Espanaye no traces were here seen; but an unusual quantity of soot being observed in the fire-place, a search was made in the chimney, and (horrible to relate!) the; corpse of the daughter, head downward, was dragged therefrom; it having been thus forced up the narrow aperture for a considerable distance.
The chimney itself was wide enough inside for a man to stand up and walk about.
She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could, and waited till she heard a little animal (she couldn't guess of what sort it was) scratching and scrambling about in the chimney close above her: then, saying to herself `This is Bill,' she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would happen next.
If once discovered, he knew he would be lost, for the roof afforded no chance of escape; he therefore resolved to descend, not through the same chimney by which he had come up, but by a similar one conducting to another room.
The little house looked so cosy and safe in the darkness, with a bright light showing through its blinds, and the chimney smoking beautifully, and Peter standing on guard.
Peter and Tabitha stood with their backs to the door, stooping over a large chest, which, apparently, they had just dragged from a cavity, or concealed closet, on the left side of the chimney. By the lamp in the old woman's hand, Mr.
Pickwick--hands across--down the middle to the very end of the room, and half-way up the chimney, back again to the door-- poussette everywhere--loud stamp on the ground--ready for the next couple--off again--all the figure over once more--another stamp to beat out the time--next couple, and the next, and the next again--never was such going; at last, after they had reached the bottom of the dance, and full fourteen couple after the old lady had retired in an exhausted state, and the clergyman's wife had been substituted in her stead, did that gentleman, when there was no demand whatever on his exertions, keep perpetually dancing in his place, to keep time to the music, smiling on his partner all the while with a blandness of demeanour which baffles all description.
In the dim light it cast he was astonished to see a man standing in his chimney, but being naturally courageous he seized a stick and made straight for the supposed thief.
He looked at the fire of logs, with its one flame pirouetting on the top in a dying dance after the breakfast-cooking and boiling, and it seemed to jig to his inward tune; also at the two chimney crooks dangling down from the cotterel or cross-bar, plumed with soot which quivered to the same melody; also at the half-empty kettle whining an accompaniment.