chisel

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Related to chiseller: chiseler, squealer

chisel

a. a hand tool for working wood, consisting of a flat steel blade with a cutting edge attached to a handle of wood, plastic, etc. It is either struck with a mallet or used by hand
b. a similar tool without a handle for working stone or metal

Chisel

 

(in Russian, doloto, also drill bit), a manual or machine woodworking tool for hollowing out openings, recesses, grooves, and so on. Hollow chisels with a drill inside are used in drilling and mortising machines. Chisels are also used for carving bone and other materials. Flint chisels began to be used in the Upper Paleolithic and bronze chisels, in Egypt and Mesopotamia during the third millennium B.C.; iron chisels were used in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C. In Russia steel chisels with cutting edges of standard dimensions were already being used during the tenth to 13th centuries A.D.

chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(agriculture)
A strong, heavy tool with curved points used for tilling; drawn by a tractor, it stirs the soil at an appreciable depth without turning it.
(design engineering)
A tool for working the surface of various materials, consisting of a metal bar with a sharp edge at one end and often driven by a mallet.

Chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(astronomy)

chisel

chisel
A hand tool with a cutting edge on one end of a metal blade (usually steel); used in dressing, shaping, or working wood, stone, metal, etc.; usually driven with a hammer or mallet. Also see cold chisel and wood chisel.

CHISEL

(language)
An extension of C for VLSI design, implemented as a C preprocessor. It produces CIF as output.

["CHISEL - An Extension to the Programming language C for VLSI Layout", K. Karplus, PHD Thesis, Stanford U, 1982].
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1961, the city of Newburgh, New York instituted a collection of draconian welfare policies that included forcing all recipients, who were commonly thought to be African American migrants from the South, to pick up their checks at the police station for eligibility audits to "weed out the chisellers.
Then there's the players, a bunch of chisellers - or 'scapegoats' as Nigel Reo-Coker put it - who basically sulked over the new arrivals for six months, got a decent manager the sack and then only pulled their fingers out once relegation was looming hideously.
For example, on hearing that his family had been allocated a house in Crumlin, Brendan Behan told his brother, Dominic, that "the chisellers in Kimmage don't have time to play games, they have to go huntin' with their fathers.
The young chisellers will find, all too soon, that life after school is considerably harsher than anything encountered in make-shift classrooms, whiffy lavatories and school halls where lurk the ghosts of long-since eaten lunches.
If anybody was guilty the entrepreneurs and chisellers on the fight fringe were.