chloral hydrate


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chloral hydrate

(klōr`əl hī`drāt), central nervous system depressantdepressant,
any one of various substances that diminish functional activity, usually by depressing the nervous system. Barbiturates, sedatives, alcohol, and meprobamate are all depressants. Depressants have various modes of action and effects.
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 that is widely used as a hypnotic, or sleep-inducing drug. Chloral hydrate is the common ingredient, along with alcohol, in what are popularly known as knockout drops or Mickey Finns; the combination can induce acute intoxication and coma.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chloral Hydrate

 

also known as 2,2,2-trichloroeth-anediol-1,1, CCl3CH(OH)2; colorless crystals that are soluble in water, alcohol, and ether and have a melting point of 53°C. Chloral hydrate is obtained by the interaction of chloral and water. It is a medicinal preparation belonging to the hypnotic group of drugs. It also exhibits sedative, analgesic, and antispasmodic effects. It is taken orally in powder or tablet form or rectally, mainly by persons with sleeping problems or person suffering from anxiety or epilepsy. It is a constituent of Denta tooth drops.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

chloral hydrate

[′klȯr·əl ′hī‚drāt]
(organic chemistry)
CCl3CH(OH)2 Colorless, deliquescent needles with slightly bitter caustic taste, soluble in water; a hypnotic. Also known as crystalline chloral; hydrated chloral.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chloral hydrate

a colourless crystalline soluble solid produced by the reaction of chloral with water and used as a sedative and hypnotic; 2,2,2-trichloro-1,1-ethanediol. Formula: CCl3CH(OH)2
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Pediatric chloral hydrate poisonings and death following outpatient procedural sedation.
The rest three parts contain 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 g of chloral hydrate with 2 ml from the stock 4PNPAN solution.
At 48 h after MCAO, the rats (n = 6 per group) were anesthetized with chloral hydrate (10%, stored in 4[degrees]C refrigerator) and decapitated.
After assessment of the neurological defect score, rats (n = 5 per group) were anesthetized with 10% chloral hydrate (3ml/kg BW, i.p.) and perfused transcardially with ice PBS followed by 4% PFA (paraformaldehyde in PBS, pH = 7.4).
Results of medetomidine used in combination with propofol ketamine and chloral hydrate (groups B D and F) were efficient than alone.
At 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the injection of the rAAV2-hGAD65 and/or fibroblasts (TH), the PD rats were deeply anaesthetized with chloral hydrate and perfused in tracardially with 0.9% saline, followed by 4% paraformaldehyde (4[degrees]C).
These fractures in all the species were treated by using different anesthetics like Xylazine (49 animals), chloral hydrate (4 animals), combination of Xylazine and Ketamine (37 animals) and Lignocaine hydochloride (1 animal).
Following anesthesia with intraperitoneal 10% chloral hydrate (300 mg/kg), right nephrectomy was done in these animals.
Comparison of chloral hydrate and midazolam for sedation of neonates for neuroimaging studies.
Chloral hydrate was described by Oscar Liebrich in 1869 in Berlin, where he used it as an oral premedication.
He had already become interested in eye surgery and had experimented with anesthetizing the eye with morphine, ether spray, chloral hydrate and potassium bromide, all of which were known to have effects on the nervous system.