antiseptic

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antiseptic,

agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms on the external surfaces of the body. Antiseptics should generally be distinguished from drugs such as antibiotics that destroy microorganisms internally, and from disinfectants, which destroy microorganisms found on nonliving objects. Germicides include only those antiseptics that kill microorganisms. Some common antiseptics are alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. There is great variation in the ability of antiseptics to destroy microorganisms and in their effect on living tissue. For example, mercuric chloride is a powerful antiseptic, but it irritates delicate tissue. In contrast, silver nitrate kills fewer germs but can be used on the delicate tissues of the eyes and throat. There is also a great difference in the time required for different antiseptics to work. Iodine, one of the fastest-working antiseptics, kills bacteria within 30 sec. Other antiseptics have slower, more residual action. Since so much variability exists, systems have been devised for measuring the action of an antiseptic against certain standards. The bacteriostatic action of an antiseptic compared to that of phenol (under the same conditions and against the same microorganism) is known as its phenol coefficient. Joseph Lister was the first to employ the antiseptic phenol, or carbolic acid, in surgery, following the discovery by Louis Pasteur that microorganisms are the cause of infections. Modern surgical techniques for avoiding infection are founded on asepsis, the absence of pathogenic organisms. Sterilization is the chief means of achieving asepsis.

antiseptic

[¦an·tə¦sep·tik]
(microbiology)
A substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in the human or animal body.

antiseptic

an agent or substance that prevents infection by killing germs
References in periodicals archive ?
However, during allergy investigations, tobramycin was found to be well tolerated and chlorhexidine was identified as the culprit drug.
"Interestingly, one study does suggest that one-time cleansing with chlorhexidine reduces neonatal mortality when compared to dry cord care; however, most of the existing evidence suggests that antiseptic treatment does not offer a benefit over dry cord care," they wrote.
There was significant difference in the zone of inhibition of chlorhexidine, black tea (Aqueous), black tea (Alcoholic), oolong tea (Alcoholic), oolong tea (Aqueous) in the dilution of 1:2, 1:4 & 1:8 respectively.
Antimicrobial effect and pH of chlorhexidine gel and calcium hydroxide alone and associated with other materials.
Palliative management with topical steroid, chlorhexidine gluconate-based mouthwashes or NSAIDs is recommended with a follow-up examination of at least 4 weeks.
Conclusion: Chlorhexidine alcohol solution is superior to povidone iodine in reducing surgical site infection when used for preparing skin before surgery in clean contaminated cases.
A comparison of 2.0% chlorhexidine gluconate and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite as antimicrobial endodontic irrigants.
ARCOS & GOLDMAN (2010) evaluated the effectiveness of applying 2% chlorhexidine gluconate + 70% alcohol and 2% iodine tincture + 70% alcohol antisepsis protocols to humans.
After the solid media achieved, the media were perforated to make holes as the storage of the extract and chlorhexidine gluconate.
Several strategies are employed to reduce CRBSIs; these include skin antisepsis, prescription of prophylactic antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial catheters, implementation of catheter care bundles, chlorhexidine baths, and addition of antimicrobials (in the form of antimicrobial locks or dressings) to catheters.2
Topical antiseptics (chlorhexidine gluconate) and systemic antibiotics are the most commonly used antimicrobial agents to prevent these complications.