antiseptic

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antiseptic,

agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms on the external surfaces of the body. Antiseptics should generally be distinguished from drugs such as antibiotics that destroy microorganisms internally, and from disinfectants, which destroy microorganisms found on nonliving objects. Germicides include only those antiseptics that kill microorganisms. Some common antiseptics are alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. There is great variation in the ability of antiseptics to destroy microorganisms and in their effect on living tissue. For example, mercuric chloride is a powerful antiseptic, but it irritates delicate tissue. In contrast, silver nitrate kills fewer germs but can be used on the delicate tissues of the eyes and throat. There is also a great difference in the time required for different antiseptics to work. Iodine, one of the fastest-working antiseptics, kills bacteria within 30 sec. Other antiseptics have slower, more residual action. Since so much variability exists, systems have been devised for measuring the action of an antiseptic against certain standards. The bacteriostatic action of an antiseptic compared to that of phenol (under the same conditions and against the same microorganism) is known as its phenol coefficient. Joseph Lister was the first to employ the antiseptic phenol, or carbolic acid, in surgery, following the discovery by Louis Pasteur that microorganisms are the cause of infections. Modern surgical techniques for avoiding infection are founded on asepsis, the absence of pathogenic organisms. Sterilization is the chief means of achieving asepsis.

antiseptic

[¦an·tə¦sep·tik]
(microbiology)
A substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in the human or animal body.

antiseptic

an agent or substance that prevents infection by killing germs
References in periodicals archive ?
The application of Chlorhexidine Gel is the gold standard now.
Recently it has been observed that irrigants such as MTAD or 2% chlorhexidine may be effective to solve the problem to eradicate the bacteria during single visit but studies are needed to validate this claim.
Further, the new materials showed sustained drug release and provided antifungal effects for weeks (in case of chlorhexidine digluconate) to month (in case of miconazole) and also made the specimens disc capable of being charged again.
Maternal and child health workers conducted home visits on days 1, 4, 10 and 28 postpartum, and instructed mothers of infants in the intervention group to apply 4% chlorhexidine solution to the umbilical stump once per day until three days after cord separation; mothers of infants in the control group were instructed to provide dry cord care.
In this research we used chlorhexidine solution 4% (Hydrex, Ecolab Co, Germany).
mutans count in plaque were seen in both the green tea and chlorhexidine groups.
Keywords: Povidone-iodine, Chlorhexidine gluconate scrubs, Surgical site infections.
Although exposure to chlorhexidine is common, allergic contact dermatitis is rare (Tahoka & Nixon, 2013).
The application was supported by data received from three large published community-based randomised controlled trials of 4% aqueous chlorhexidine solution in Nepal, Bangladesh, and Pakistan.
In a study by Mook and coworkers, after performing skin preparation with a scrub brush filled with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate followed by cleaning with an ethyl-isopropyl alcohol solution and final preparation with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and 70% isopropyl alcohol paint, three periscapular tissue cultures were taken in patients undergoing an open deltopectoral approach.
5% hydrogen peroxide mouthwash as an adjunct to chlorhexidine proved to be a better antiplaque agent when compared with chlorhexidine alone.