chocolate liquor


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chocolate liquor

[′chäk·lət ′lik·ər]
(food engineering)
In chocolate manufacture, the liquid coming from the dried cocoa nibs during the grinding process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bittersweet and semisweet chocolate must contain at least 35 percent chocolate liquor by weight.
Unsweetened chocolate liquor that is processed to remove most of the fat, then ground into cocoa powder.
When cocoa beans are roasted and ground, what remains is a paste called chocolate liquor, which contains both cocoa solids and cocoa butter.
White chocolate contains no chocolate liquor, but instead consists of cocoa butter, sugar, dairy products, and flavourings, it must contain at least 20 percent cocoa butter and no more than 55 percent sugar.
Just keep in mind that chocolate makers can increase the "% cacao" by adding extra cocoa powder (good), extra cocoa butter (not so good, because it means more calories and saturated fat), or extra chocolate liquor (a little of both).
The remaining chocolate liquor then goes into a huge shell-shaped vat where it is rotated and stirred constantly with paddles or blades, causing heat to be produced from the friction of mixing.
2 parts white chocolate liquor 1 part Baileys 1 part Frangelico Chill and strain into snifter; garnish with shelled peanut.
The world's leading producer of high-quality cocoa and chocolate products, decided to improve their business processes to ensure the safety of its cocoa butter, powder and chocolate liquor used for finished products in the baking and candy industries.
Bittersweet chocolate must contain at least 35 percent chocolate liquor, and many brands now far exceed that.
During the milling process, the nib is grinded to become a smooth, dark, rich and bitter chocolate liquid called chocolate liquor, but no alcohol is involved
The nibs are ground up into a liquid called chocolate liquor, which is a mixture of cocoa and cocoa butter.