cholangiogram


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cholangiogram

[kə′lan·jē·ə‚gram]
(medicine)
The x-ray film produced by means of cholangiography.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also the majority of patients in their study were ASA 1 (88%) and the remainder were ASA 2 (12%), there were no intraoperative cholangiograms, and 16% of the patients who stayed more than 8 hours were temporarily transferred to the main hospital surgical ward.
Caption: Figure 1: (a) ERCP with cholangiogram showing dilated common bile duct (pointed black arrow) with prepapillary common bile duct stricture (arrow head).
In spite of the care taken, sometimes gallstones may be spilled when choledochotomy of the cystic duct is performed for intraoperative cholangiogram. In the event of inadvertent gallbladder perforation, the defect may be closed with a loop ligature (Endoloop) or a grasper to minimize spillage [41].
Four of eleven patients with prior cholecystectomy had cholecystectomy at referring institution, immediately prior to transfer or referral, where intraoperative cholangiogram revealed a filling defect in the CBD.
Inclusion criteria Exclusion criteria (1) Day case laparoscopic (1) Emergency cholecystectomy cholecystectomy (2) Any BMI, any sex (2) Planned open cholecystectomy (3) Cholecystitis (3) CBD exploration (4) Previous ERCP/PTC (5) Empyema, hepatobiliary cancer (6) No recorded BMI BMI: Body Mass Index; CBD: Common Bile Duct; PTC: Percutaneous Transcutaneous Cholangiogram; ERCP: Endoscopic Retrograde Cholan-giopancreatography.
Caption: Figure 1: Cholangiogram demonstrating filling defects representative of biliary stones (arrows) present in the common bile duct.
In addition, several operative and postoperative factors were also associated with a long hospital stay including types of intraoperative antiemetic drug (p = 0.021), intraoperative cholangiogram (p = 0.037), operative time (p = 0.010), incidental perforation of the gallbladder (p = 0.005), use of an abdominal drain (p < 0.001), PONV (p = 0.008), postoperative pain (p < 0.001), parenteral analgesia requirement (p = 0.001), oral analgesia requirement (p < 0.001), and complications (p = 0.005) (Tables 3 and 4).
If there is ductal continuity, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram and placement of a temporary plastic biliary stent is the treatment of choice for a cystic duct leak.
Imaging modalities to diagnose, detect level, and follow-up of cases of BDI and bile leak (BL) were ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and T-tube cholangiogram. Patients were divided in two groups--BDI and BL.
The biliary drain is left in situ for 4-6 weeks and dilatation is usually repeated on a few occasions until the cholangiogram demonstrates resolution of the stricture with adequate bile drainage, at which point the biliary drain is removed.
Hence, a T-tube was inserted and intraoperative cholangiogram was obtained, which was initially interpreted as normal ductal anatomy with no evidence of leak (Figure 1-A).
Cholangiogram was done for all cases (the gold standard evaluation of biliary injuries) as a trans-tube cholangiogram (with a T-tube in place), an endoscopic cholangiography endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in most cases, or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram in some selected cases in which endoscopic approaches failed.