cholecystokinin


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Related to cholecystokinin: enterogastrone, secretin

cholecystokinin

[‚kō·lə‚sis·tə′kī·nən]
(biochemistry)
A hormone produced by the mucosa of the upper intestine which stimulates contraction of the gallbladder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oors et al., "Duodenal lipid-induced symptom generation in gastroesophageal reflux disease: role of apolipoprotein A-IV and cholecystokinin," Neurogastroenterology & Motility, vol.
Molecular characterization of cholecystokinin in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus): cloning, localization, developmental profile, and effect of fasting and refeeding on expression in the brain and intestine.
(2004) PKC-delta and -epsilon regulate NF-kappaB activation induced by cholecystokinin and TNF-alpha in pancreatic acinar cells.
Pi-Sunyer, "Cholecystokinin and stomach distension combine to reduce food intake in humans," American Journal of Physiology Regulatory Integrative & Comparative Physiology, vol.
Rovira-Esteban et al., "Properties and dynamics of inhibitory synaptic communication within the CA3 microcircuits of pyramidal cells and interneurons expressing parvalbumin or cholecystokinin," The Journal of Physiology, vol.
First described with the help of cholecystokinin cholecystography, (29-32) it remains a highly debated and evolving entity.
First, the weight loss could stem from the "anorexia of aging," meaning that dysfunctional production of certain hormones such as cholecystokinin, leptin, cytokines, dynorphin, neuropeptide Y, and serotonin--or dysfunctional dietary intakes and energy metabolism could lead patients to eat less, which could in turn raise MCI risk.
The lipid content reduced the gastric emptying by increasing the cholecystokinin secretion in duodenum.
Cholecystokinin cholescintigraphy: Methodology and normal values using a lactose-free fatty-meal food supplement.
The gut participates in the hunger-satiety circuit by secreting two important hormones; one of them is Cholecystokinin (CCK).
For example, when your body needs food, a feedback loop triggers hunger and you eat until you're full, when another feedback loop triggers the release of Cholecystokinin (CCK), a satiation hormone, and you stop eating.