Inhibitor

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Related to cholinesterase inhibitor: Donepezil, acetylcholine, Memantine

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because bradycardia is a relatively common occurrence in older patients after using cholinesterase inhibitors [6,7], Holter ECG parameters such as mean heart rate (HR), the lowest HR, and the longest RR were determined.
Kurz A, Van Baelen B: Ginkgo biloba compared with cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of dementia: a review based on meta-analyses by the Cochrane collaboration.
Bradycardia is a contraindication for all cholinesterase inhibitors."
The most common pesticide exposures across all age groups were cholinesterase inhibitors (25.3%), anticoagulant rodenticides (20.5%) and pyrethroids (14.4%).
(2000) that CPF is more than a cholinesterase inhibitor. Crumpton et al.
The newest cholinesterase inhibitor, rivastigmine, has not been compared head to head with donepezil, the most common treatment.
Data source: Data from 385 patients in the nonrandomized, multicenter Swedish Alzheimer Treatment Study (SATS), launched to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of cholinesterase inhibitor treatment in a routine clinical setting.
Moreover, costs related to drug-combination treatment are falling: Memantine is expected to be available as a generic drug within a few years, and galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is already available in generic form.
The study, published in the July/September issue of Alzheimer's Disease and Associated Disorders, included 382 patients, mean age 73,144 of whom received no drug treatment, 122 who were treated with a cholinesterase inhibitor (CI), such as donepezil (Aricept), and 116 who received both a CI and memantine (Namenda).
Recent studies, however, have failed to show a clinically or statistically significant benefit from cholinesterase inhibitor augmentation in schizophrenia (Table 2).
Long-term cholinesterase inhibitor therapy for Alzheimer's disease: practical considerations for the primary care physician.
The first controlled study assessing workers who suffered acute poisoning from cholinesterase inhibitor compounds and/or organochlorides was reported by Savage et al.