Chondroma


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Related to Chondroma: chondrosarcoma, chordoma

chondroma

[kän′drō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign tumor of bone, cartilage, or other tissue which simulates the structure of cartilage in its growth.

Chondroma

 

a benign tumor of mature cartilage tissue. Chondromas occur in cartilages of the skeleton and, less commonly, in extraskeletal cartilages (larynx and trachea) or in organs that do not normally contain cartilage tissue (for example, the lungs and kidneys). Parts of the skeleton most often affected are the metatarsus, metacarpus, the phalanges of the fingers, the ribs, and the sternum. The affected bone becomes deformed. Diagnosis is made mainly on the basis of X rays. Treatment is surgical; recurrences are rare and are usually due to incomplete removal of the tumor. Chondromas may become malignant, converting into chondrosarcomas.

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(1,12,17,23,29) Para-articular chondromas have been postulated to represent the end stage of Hoffa's disease.
Summary: Only 120 nasal chondromas reported to date globally
Soft-tissue chondroma of the oral cavity is uncommon; very few [2-6] cases have been reported in the English literature.
Soucacos, "Extraskeletal chondroma of the foot," Joint Bone Spine, vol.
Chondroma is a benign tumour of mesenchymal origin and slow growth that is composed of cartilage and is rarely located in soft tissues, being more commonly described in the fingers, limbs, and head or neck [1].
The patient's right lower quadrant abdominal pain resolved following resection of the bladder chondroma, suggesting it may have been related to the tumour, as reported in an earlier case.
The closest differential diagnosis on imaging for a convexity or falx chondroma is meningioma.
In recent years, many radiologists and clinicians have been working on the development of IFP into metaplasia and chondroma due to these mesenchymal cells.
It might be omitted only in the case of clinically and radiologically unambiguous benign lesions, such as chondroma, osteochondroma, osteoid osteoma, simple bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia, or nonossifying fibroma.
The clinical differential diagnosis for pilomatricoma in children includes epidermal inclusion cyst, ossifying hematoma, branchial remnant, preauricular sinus, lymphadenopathy, giant cell tumor, chondroma, dermoid cyst, degenerating fibroxanthoma, foreign body reaction, and osteoma cutis [2].