Choriambus

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Choriambus

 

in Russian syllabotonic versification, a combination of two iambic feet, with the first foot lacking a conventional stress but having another stress, generally placed on a monosyllabic word. An example is “Zhízn’—bez nachála i kontsa” (“Life is without beginning and without end,” A. A. Blok).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in Tennyson's hendecasyllables, as in the Latin meter, the choriambic position conspicuously and eccentrically spans the second and third "feet." The poem's many metrical games-its puns, repetitions, bizarre diction-make meter into an intellectual game.
One strophe and antistrophe provide the sole examples in the play of a decidedly choriambic meter; a few lines show the pattern (the second and fifth lines are in a distinct meter):
Yet because the choriambic sections of the translation's first parodos do not technically diverge from an iambic scheme, and instead take their cue from the Greek, they become anti-iambic for a very different reason than Patmore or Symonds consider.
What makes these lines "Greek" is not merely the choriambic element intruding on iambic meters but the surprising infusion of the native, scanable English pattern where there was only an abstract Greek pattern.
(26) Rather, Swinburne enjoyed playing with a multitude of verse forms, such as Sapphics, choriambics, and other varieties adopted from classical and Continental poetry.
He notes Beaumont and Fletcher's ingenious use of "Iambic Pentameter Hyperacatalectic, their Proceleusmatics, and Dispondaeuses-proceleusmatics," "not to mention the Choriambics, the Ionics, the Paeons, and the Epitrites." Trained by his knowledge of Greek, he hears "Quantity," "Accent," "emphasis," and "retardation & acceleration of the Times of Syllables according to the meaning of the words, the passion that accompanies them, and even the Character of the Person that uses them" (Marg.
Egerton, went not to Mason or Curnow but to 'B' for his deeply traditional 'Choriambics' (first) and to Mulgan for his graceful but derivative 'Odysseus' (second equal), with its echoes of Tennyson's 'Ulysses' and 'The Lotos-Eaters' (Mulgan won the prose prize for his essay).
2: 199-216) contrasts Tennyson's carefully regular choriambics in "Hendecasyllabics" with Robinson's looser appropriation.