chorioretinal


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chorioretinal

[‚kȯr·ē·ə′ret·ən·əl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to the choroid and retina of the eye.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It may also be associated with papilloedema, vascular tor tuosity, chorioretinal folds and maculopathy.2 One advantage of 23-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy is a shorter period of operation time.
Presentations: Title: Suprachoroidal administration of DNA nanoparticles transfect chorioretinal cells in primates and rabbits: Dr.
Bilateral fundic examination revealed healed chorioretinal scars with hypo- and hyperpigmented areas diffusely around the pecten.
For over 30 years, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography have been extremely valuable for expanding our knowledge of anatomy, pathology and pathophysiology of the retina and choroid, and have aided the diagnosis, helps in identifying the cause of the pathology and monitoring of the treatment of retinal vascular, macular disorders and chorioretinal diseases (3),(4)
(29) This is of particular concern as eyes with increased axial length and deformation of the posterior segment can lead to several lesions including myopic choroidal neovascularisation, lacquer cracks, chorioretinal atrophy, posterior staphyloma and macular retinoschisis.
(4,5,6) Quantitative analysis of choroidal vasculature is necessary to understand the pathophysiology of choroidal disorders and to evaluate chorioretinal diseases.
Ghost maculopathy: an artifact on near-infrared reflectance and multicolor imaging masquerading as chorioretinal pathology.
Ventura and her team later reported on 10 microcephalic children with similar presentations of chorioretinal atrophy and optic nerve alteration (2), while in their February 2016 article, de Paula Freitas et al.
The EDI-OCT provides evaluation of the choroid, and facilitates understanding of the chorioretinal abnormalities and diseases (24).
Examination of choroidal thickness provides important information in the diagnosis and management of various ocular and systemic diseases leading to chorioretinal inflammatory changes (4,15).
* Selected congenital eye anomalies: microphthalmia or anophthalmia; coloboma; cataract; intraocular calcifications; chorioretinal anomalies involving the macula (e.g., chorioretinal atrophy and scarring, macular pallor, and gross pigmentary mottling), excluding retinopathy of prematurity; optic nerve atrophy, pallor, and other optic nerve abnormalities.
In myopic eyes smaller macular volume and thinner retina as demonstrated by OCT scans is because of increased chorioretinal atrophic changes associated with increase in scleral and retinal thinning8,17.