chorography

(redirected from chorographical)
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Related to chorographical: Chorology

chorography

[kə′räg·rə·fē]
(mapping)
All of the methods used to map a region or district.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aptly titled "The Jewel in the Crown," the treatment of Amsterdam is organized around the chorographical milestones erected by three major figures, Johannes Isacius Pontanus (1611), Olfert Dapper (1663) and Caspar Commelin (1693).
The major Italian chorographical passages of Malebolge proper on the other hand--which include the Alpine territory around Mantua minutely described by Virgil in Inferno 20.
He shows that chorographical additions and alterations were among the most common changes made by the humanists in these vitae.
"Illustrations." The Poly-Olbion: A Chorographical Description of Great Britain.
I am at the moment developing a live electronic multi-channel piece for maracas, in which a microphonic space is proposed for creating a surround amplification ring, and is at the same time a control interface for sound spatialisation and digital signal processing, and a chorographical space for musical performance.
While Stow was undoubtedly influenced by the antiquarian and chorographical works such as William Lambarde's Perambulations of Kent (1576), William Harrison's Description of England (1576), and William Camden's Brittania (1586), his Survey also appears to borrow from and certainly reads like the work of an exceptionally well-informed and well-read city viewer, albeit one versed in antiquarian pursuits.
And Andrew Gordon contrasts the Survey's depiction of urban space with the more abstract spatial politics implicit in chorographical writings by William Lambarde, John Norden, and William Camden.
Though Stow's Survey of London is often linked with "chorographical works" like William Lambarde's Perambulation of Kent and William Camden's Britannia (1586), its real inspiration, Andrew Gordon claims, is not the cartographic logic of works like these, but the art of the surveyor, whose duty (John Fitzherbert explained) was to "ryde or go ouer & se euery parcel" under his purview.
chorographical, topographical delineations, to behold, as it were, all the remote provinces, towns, cities of the world, and never to go forth of the limits of his study, to measure by the scale and compass their extent, distance, examine their site' (II, 89).
(1) Tristram Risdon, The Chorographical Description, or Survey, of the County of Devon, with the City and County of Exeter, etc., London, 1811, p.
Cartographers in sixteenth-century England assembled maps for King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I, decorating their products with cartouches, borders, and symbolic figures.(10) In 1610, Britannia graced the top of the title page of the English historian and chronicler William Camden's Britain: or a Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland and the Islands Adjacent: From the earliest antiquity.(11) Britannia is featured in an oval cartouche at the top of the map.
(See, e.g., James Duncan and David Ley's collection of essays, Place/Culture/Representation (London: Routledge, 1993).) For, as lengthy chorographical description cannot belong on stage, the sense of place can only be evoked in so far as it is dramatized through character and action, which inevitably convey a much stronger sense of culture -- through people, customs, and traditions -- than they do of actual physical location.