chorus frog


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chorus frog:

see tree frogtree frog,
name for any of the small tree- or shrub-inhabiting frogs of the family Hylidae, characterized by an adhesive disk on the tip of each of the clawlike toes. This family has about 300 species distributed throughout most tropical and temperate regions, with the greatest
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Cave Cave Wooded Perimeter Species Entrance Interior Sinkhole Area Blanchard's Cricket Frog X X X American Toad X X X X Fowler's Toad X Gray Treefrog complex X X X Plains Leopard Frog X X X X American Bullfrog X X X X Pickerel Frog X X X X Southern Leopard Frog X X X Spring Peeper X X X X Western Chorus Frog X X Eastern Spadefoot X X X Long-tailed Salamander X X X Northern Slimy Salamander X X Copperhead X X North American Racer X X Milksnake X Common Watersnake X Rough Greensnake X Western Ratsnake X X X Dekay's Brownsnake X Common Gartersnake X X X Broad-headed Skink X X Painted Turtle X X Common Snapping Turtle X Eastern Box Turtle X X Pond Slider X Total (26) 14 11 13 24
The gray treefrog breeds later than the chorus frog and spring peeper, but earlier than the cricket frog.
The increase in tail depth and decrease in body length in the presence of aeshnid dragonflies has been found in other studies of wood frogs and leopard frogs (Van Buskirk and Relyea 1998, Relyea and Werner 2000) as well as in chorus frogs and gray tree frogs (Smith and Van Buskirk 1995, McCollum and Van Buskirk 1996, McCollum and Leimberger 1997, Van Buskirk et al.
Population structure and competition among kin in the chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata).
Key words: Ambystoma macrodactylum, Anaxyrus boreas, Boreal Chorus Frog, Columbia Spotted Frog, distribution, Lithobates sylvaticus, Long-toed Salamander, northern British Columbia, Pseudacris maculata, Rana luteiventris, Western Toad, Wood Frog
Barely the size of your thumb (just 1 to 1 1/2 inches long), the chorus frog seems an unlikely creature to divide the science community.
melleni was reported in the Cajun chorus frog, Pseudacris fouquettei (=Pseudacris feriarum) from Texas by McAllister et al.
The western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata, ISUVC #4022) was encountered at only four localities: two flooded areas north of I-70, the mitigation wetlands, and the bat roosting area, where it was most common.
Usually found in damp meadows with low shrubs and grasses, the Western Chorus Frog is a small secretive frog with dark stripes down its back, a dark facial mask and a white line on its upper lip.
George Reserve by collecting chorus frog egg masses from ponds where they had been naturally deposited, and by allowing spring peeper breeding adults to mate in covered 35 x 25 x 14 cm plastic boxes containing water and vegetation (spring peepers deposit their eggs singly making collection of eggs in the field impractical).
So do the animals that catch them, such as this chorus frog (far left).