chromium carbide


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chromium carbide

[′krō·mē·əm ′kär‚bīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
Cr3C2 Orthorhombic crystals with a melting point of 1890°C; resistant to oxidation, acids, and alkalies; used for hot-extrusion dies, in spray-coating materials, and as a component for pumps and valves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relatively few studies have focused on separately synthesized chromium carbide ([Cr.sub.3][C.sub.2]) or a [Cr.sub.3][C.sub.2]-based cermet as reinforcement candidates and on their influence on the wear resistance of hardfacings.
Offering a high proportion of extremely hard multiple alloy complex carbides deposited on a mild-steel backing plate, Duroxite 200 will last much longer than common chromium carbide overlay (CCO) products, according to the company.
Due to the chromium content in the EDS analysis and the type of carbides obtained, they can be made of chromium carbide or chromium carbide complex (Fig.
Combining a strong steel base and a hard overlay welded chromium carbide protective layer, Kalmetall suits many applications including screw conveyors, ventilator housings, cyclones and separators, mixer linings, piping components, screens, troughs and transport channels.
This ambient temperature ferrite is supersaturated in carbon; therefore, the excess carbon is precipitated as chromium carbide which promotes intergranular corrosion when in hostile environment [4].
A topcoat of up to 0.014" chromium carbide alloy would then be applied at around 100p per pass, to provide wear resistance to the engine component, using the plasma system.
WEAR RESISTANCE LTD specialise in weld application of Tungsten or Chromium Carbide deposits, or a combination of both, to components which are subjected to excessive wear.
Some coatings that have been commercially produced consist of a monolayer of titanium carbide (TIC), titanium nitride (TIN), titanium aluminum nitride (TiA1N), titanium carbonitride (TiCN), chromium nitride (CrN), chromium carbide (CrC), or diamond-like carbon.
They should be protected by materials such as titanium, cast iron or stainless steel with a chromium carbide finish.
It is the formation of chromium carbide that compromises corrosion resistance when carbon is added to harden stainless steel by common methods.
White lamellas of nickel, light orbicular particles, lamellas of titanium silicides of complex composition, fine-dispersed particles of chromium carbide of up to 5 mm size, and dark coarse particles and lamellas of aluminium oxide prevail in it.