chryselephantine


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

chryselephantine

(krĭs'ĕləfăn`tĭn, –tīn), Greek sculptural technique developed in the 6th cent. B.C. Sculptures, especially temple colossi, were made with an inner core of wood overlaid with ivory, to simulate flesh, and gold, to represent drapery. The great Parthenon Athena, now lost, was chryselephantine.

chryselephantine

Made of gold and ivory; descriptive of statues of divinities, like Zeus at Olympia, with ivory for the flesh and gold for the drapery, on a wooden armature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relatively less well known are Lorenzl's chryselephantine sculptures, less valuable today than those by Chiparus and Priess but a strength of the Knutsford collection.
He appears to have concentrated his output in bronze and chryselephantine sculptures and like his contemporaries, he depicted exotic women in theatrical poses.
This emphasis on chryselephantine sculpture partly needs to be read against the background of the prevailing ethnocentrism.
The intrinsic value of the materials employed predominates in the earlier model: the value of plate at an Athenian symposium, or the value of gold and ivory in the chryselephantine statues by Phidias.
Called Three Cantos I-III, they were designed as the start of a "chryselephantine poem of immeasurable length" an "endless poem of no known category," as the author variously referred to it.
The photos and reconstructions of particular sites are spectacular, but I do find the way in which the material is ordered often little short of being bizarre: why, to quote a single example, have a couple of gold masks from Mycenae on pages 116-17 but another couple so very much later on page 189, and is it really true that the chryselephantine statues from Delphi were found `in a sort of warehouse' (212)?
The Athena of the Attalid library is the most revealing example, and constitutes valuable evidence of what Pheidias's chryselephantine statue for the Parthenon was like.
Schweitzer's statue of Zeus is thus not to be identified with the Cypselid Zeus, especially since the statue described by Pausanias may well have been chryselephantine, and the Cypselid Zeus was made of hammered gold (that is, it was sphyrelaton).(24) Yet Schweitzer's comments on the significance of the style of the standing Zeus are suggestive - it was archaic, old-fashioned, and thus Phaedrus' offer acquires a comic touch: Socrates' statue will be located among archaic examples of sculpture.(25) Even though Schweitzer's Zeus is not the same as the Cypselid one, the style of the Cypselid Zeus was also old-fashioned.
104) suggests that Pheidias' chryselephantine statue of Athena Parthenos is meant, but since this was nearly fifty feet tall Charmides would have had to be content with embracing her shin.
We are also treated to explanations of how ivory is shaped, bent, and molded to create a chryselephantine statue, with illustrations, and why the pool in front of the statue was necessary; it's the glue in the joined strips that needs the moisture.