chrysotile


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chrysotile:

see serpentineserpentine
, hydrous silicate of magnesium. It occurs in crystalline form only as a pseudomorph having the form of some other mineral and is generally found in the form of chrysotile (silky fibers) and antigorite and lizardite (which are both tabular).
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chrysotile

[′kris·ō‚tīl]
(mineralogy)
Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 A fibrous form of serpentine that constitutes one type of asbestos.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The weak performance compared to 3Q17 was, partially, offset by chrysotile exports and the appreciation of the US dollar against the Brazilian real.
The growth of EBT-8 cells was inhibited by exposure to a UICC standard sample of chrysotile asbestos at over 50 [micro]g/ml (Figure 1(a)).
Chrysotile was found in two preschools, in a teachers room and a classroom, at lower than the filter background level.
(18.) King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang 2013 Analysis, review and recommendation on safe use of Chrysotile 2013 (Thai report).
Follow-up study of chrysotile asbestos textile workers: cohort mortality and case-control analyses.
In 2008 Health Canada created a panel of international experts to discuss the potency and carcinogenic effect of chrysotile asbestos relative to other forms of asbestos.
DISCUSSION: Malignant mesothelioma is pleural malignancy strongly associated with exposure to crocidolite, chrysotile, amosite and all other type of asbestos.
For instance, an asbestos factory near Gadap, dumps its waste in the neighborhood and has been causing cancer amongst many due to Chrysotile asbestos, whose use has been banned in 52 countries for this reason.
Specifically, they are defined as being long and thin (having an aspect ratio greater than 3:1), and falling into categories of either "serpentine" (chrysotile) or "amphibole" (tremolite, amosite, crocidolite, actinolite, and anthophyllite) [7].
Since 2004 the Russian Federation, on behalf of its asbestos industry and with the assistance of Kazakhstan, Canada and a handful of other countries, has fought to prevent chrysotile (one of the main minerals containing asbestos; also known as white asbestos) from being listed in Annex III of the Rotterdam Convention.