Chukar

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Related to chukar partridges: rock partridge
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chukar

 

(Alectoris kakelik), also chukar partridge, a bird of the family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes. The size of a hazel hen, it weighs 350–700 g. The back is olive green or bluish gray, the sides have dark stripes, and the bill and legs are red. The chukar is distributed in the mountains from the Balkans to China inclusively. In the USSR it is found in the Caucasus, Middle Asia, southern Kazakhstan, the southern Altai, and the Tuva ASSR. Similar species are found in southern Europe, in northern Africa, and on the Arabian Peninsula. The bird settles on rocky mountain slopes (from the foothills to the snow line) overgrown with sparse shrubs. In winter it moves to the foothills. The chukar nests on the ground, laying nine to 12 eggs (less often 14–17), which are incubated 23–25 days. The bird feeds on the green parts of plants, on seeds, and on insects. It is hunted and is often kept in cages in Middle Asia. Its numbers are decreasing sharply.

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 4. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A. Gladkov. Moscow, 1952.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(a) Image of a chukar partridge with rotated leg and (b) leg plucked before surgery.
(a) Image of the chukar partridge after the functional healing is completed and just before the implant removal, (b) Mediolateral and (c) craniocaudal radiographic images of the partridge after implant removal.
According to Blumstein (1995) globally important birds like Snow Partridge (Lerwa lerwa), Himalayan Snow Cock (Tetraogallus himalayensis), Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar), Snow Pigeon (Columbia leuconota), Pintail (Anas acuta), Common Teal (Anas crecca) and many others are found in the different areas of Gilgit-Baltistan.The Central Karakoram National Park (CKNP) is the largest Protected Area of Pakistan spanning over 10,000 km2 containing 230 villages within its buffer zone covering more than 7000 km2 (Anonymous, 2007).
Toward the end of the day, Hafen said we were doing well enough to try something new, so he released eight chukar partridges. Chukars are a little smaller and faster than pheasants.
Electrocardiography of rock partridges (Alectoris graeca) and chukar partridges (Alectoris chukar).
Immunization of chukar partridges against coccidia (Eimeria kofoidi and Eimeria legionensis) with low doses of live oocysts.